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Yard Tuff Drum Plug Aerator (Help me choose an aerator)

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by blownalcohol, Sep 1, 2012.

  1. blownalcohol

    blownalcohol LawnSite Member
    Posts: 6

  2. blownalcohol

    blownalcohol LawnSite Member
    Posts: 6

    bump for another look.
    I have never used an aerator. I would like to know if this looks like it will do a decent job, oe should I look for another aerator?
  3. ed2hess

    ed2hess LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,204

    Try to search there was a lot of stuff a few months ago and there is a advertisement when you search on aerator.
  4. seabee003

    seabee003 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 86

    I would look for another aerator as the one in the picture you highlighted has two potential problems. First, the tines need to be able to rotate in 3 or 4 seperate groups to avoid tearing up the turf on turns. Second, you need to be able to lift the tines to cross sidewalks etc.

    Brinly-Hardy makes a 40 in (24 tine) and a 48 in (32 tine) model. Both available at Home DePot for under $200.


    You should be able to pull either of these behind a standard lawn tractor (as long as you don't have large hills).

    I have been using a 40 in (28 tine) John Deere aerator since 1999. It is the same design as the Brinly-Hardy but heavier duty. It cost about twice as much but I believed that the heavier construction would help me as I have several steep hilly areas to aerate. I usually use 3 to 4 40 lb bags of inexpensive topsoil held in the tray with bungee cords as weights.

    Unless you have hills or large areas of lawn to cover, I would think the Brinly-Hardy models would suffice for home owner use. Another advantage of the Brinly-Hardy models is that they are still made in the USA.

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