yes dave

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by monstermows, Feb 10, 2006.

  1. monstermows

    monstermows LawnSite Member
    from ohio
    Posts: 32

    Yes Dave I don't plan on buying home equipment to do lawns. Been looking in auto traders they usually have a small section for commercial lawnmowers and I went to H&S on holland-sylvania to look. I probably will go with something used maybe a 48" if I can find a quality one. People say to go with a handheld blower there is no way I will use a handheld when I can put a backpack on and be down in 3 minutes. I just went to a printshop and they will have 8000 doorhangers made up for me next thrus with my logo on it, credentials and services offered. I kind of offer a lot of services like tree/stump removal,powerwashing,snowplowing, hedging/pruning, mulching/bed renovation, gutter cleaning, stone patios and walkways and lawn lighting besides the basic mowing/trimming/edging/spring-fall cleanups. I have done all of that kind of work except the lawn lighting I am reading up on it if I get a call for that I guess they will become my first experiment but I would never leave without the job done it would basically be a learning experience so next time I will do better then sooner or later I will be an expert. Sometimes you have to bullshit your way through something to get the opportunity to learn how it is done. I have a two friends one that I have done a lot of powerwashing with and one I have done a lot of trees with. I spoke to them and they told me to go ahead and add those services and if I get a call for it they will bring their lifts and powerwashers so we can do the work together. And I understand my first 2 years I probably wont gross much I am thinking 20k 1st yr then 30-35K the 2nd. But if you do good quality work and continiously advertise there is work out there that the lazy people of today need done people the main thing is getting off my a$$ and doing the work. I figure in 5 years I will have 150 accounts nearing 100k gross and hopefully a fulltime teaching job by then also. Plus, I can loose the 25 pounds I gained when I went to graduate school from all that :drinkup:. Dave if you ever get too tired to do your lawns and want me to take them off your hands for you let me know my number is 555-BEER.
     
  2. PMLAWN

    PMLAWN LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,535

    Are you planning to teach and do the 150 yards by yourself, Seems like a lot

    Also do not get in over your head with the work you offer, Remember the phrase---Jack of all trades, Master of none
     
  3. monstermows

    monstermows LawnSite Member
    from ohio
    Posts: 32

    No i wouldnt plan on doing 150 lawns by myself and teach. If i had a 150 lawns and was teaching FALL/WINTER/SPRING I would be able to work in the summer on lawns because i wouldnt be teaching. IF I had 150 lawns I would by then hire help. I asked a question about doing this lawn business while I was working as a partime teacher who didn't teach in the summer. If i became fulltime teacher at some point that would be great I wouldnt have to be so dependent on lawn and landcare to make a living but if I could still have the business as I taught fulltime that would be great also to fatten my income. And about Jack of all trades I dont mean to offend anyone in this business but the work we do I do not think the average person respects and looks at it as they could do the work if they weren't so lazy. I dont think most people like at any of the services I offer as a true trade.
     
  4. monstermows

    monstermows LawnSite Member
    from ohio
    Posts: 32

    respect it and looks at the work as they could do it if they weren't so lazy. It basically is just hardwork. I dont think most people look at it as a trade. Sorry I have a bad case of dyslexia.
     
  5. PMLAWN

    PMLAWN LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,535

    After reading most of your posts in the Start up threads I think a good plan would be to sit down and do a business plan. The costs of having all the equipment to do everything and be part time could kill ya. Really look at you TRUE overhead.
    The jump from doing all the work yourself to having employees is a big financial jump. Plan for it now. Do you have the knowledge to do proper lawncare if you offer it and are you licensed to do it?
    Your customer is not lazy. They know that they make money by doing their job and than paying for less profitable tasks. If you look down at your customer (calling them lazy) you can never service them the way you need to and will fail.
    My customers do not have the tools to do everything we do and could not make the place look as good as we do or even have the time. And there is skill in doing a lot of what we do as well as knowing when to do things and how to treat things.
    The more you know about this business the more you realize how little you know.

    How hard can it be to be a molecular biologist, all you do is pour stuff from one beaker to another. --- That statement is about the same as saying LCO is not a true trade.
     
  6. monstermows

    monstermows LawnSite Member
    from ohio
    Posts: 32

    You do not go to trade school to be either a molecular biologist or a LCO you might goto seminars that does not make it a true trade. A trade is something like a millright, a machine repairman, a electrician. And "yes" your customers are mostly lazy people because i am sure you can find a 21" mower inside 90% of all garages and a weedwhip to go along with it. So I disagree with you. The population of the USA today is becoming more and more conditioned to by advancements in technology to make what was once the norm "like getting up and changing the tv channel even something as simple as that now they sit on the couch and flip through 100 channels without leaving their seat" Of course I will not approach a customer and say hey you lazy @#$! I will be doing your lawncare this summer so sit your Fat a$$ back down on your lazyboy in your air conditioned house. And of course I do not look down at them for this but I do look down on our lazy society in general a larger and larger percent becomes more afraid each year to do manual work. And trust me many people who drive by lawnworkers do look down on them. About my business plan I have done a business plan and I have my total overhead costed figured out for my first 3 years in the business including variables.
     
  7. daveintoledo

    daveintoledo LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,587

    hey pmlawn is one of those successful lcos that i was talking about , there are a few here that really have it together, including but not limited too, runner, rodfather, olderthendirt, 6'7350(is that right) sheshovel, geo..im leaving some out i know.... but these are the folks to really listen to, they have made it and know how to get there..payup

    the business plan was a really good idea, that will help you for sure..
    sounds like your well on your way.... hope things go smooth...

    im alwasy hunting for used equipment deals, if i see anything ill sure let you know...

    and im not really in toledo, my other job is downtown , but i live and mow closer to fremont... but if i called myself daveinfremont.. know one would know where that is ..:)
     
  8. daveintoledo

    daveintoledo LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,587

    the guy with the toro z for sale in the trading post, he is in fremont, he wants 5 thousand for it, its only 44 inch though, but its a really nice mower, like new, guy is old and bought it for his own property, but i think its too much for him.....i havent seen it but i have talked to him about it... seems like an honest guy....
     
  9. 6'7 330

    6'7 330 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,822

    Firstly, if you get an education in the Industry, it is possible to do better then being considered in a trade, it is possible to have a landscaping career. Go to school and get some education in the green industry and landscaping. Set down and write up a business plan, it doesn’t have to be written in stone it can be altered at various stages in the evolution of your business. Hiring the employees, is going to be much more, and then just sending them out on jobsites. You have to be able manage those employees, the cost of doing business will go up; you have to be able to manage them properly, and be able to know people.You have to know your true operating costs. For instants the cost of your machines are more then just putting gas and oil in them, but also insurance, Depreciation, and cost for just sitting idle in the off-season.

    Do a thorough investigation on the industry in your area. Find out if your area will even have room for a start up in the industry.

    Good luck and hopefully your plans go smooth.
     
  10. sheshovel

    sheshovel LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,112

    I have to say you are wrong to think that our clients are just too "lazy"to do the work..most of my clients don't have a clue as to how to even begin a job..what they need..what they need to get to do it nor how to go about it.Or they are just too old to do it.Everybody wants a nice looking landscape and most work all week and want to be able to relax with their familys on the weekend in a nice yard and not have to worry about it.So they hire a professional to install it and one to maintain it for them..I have never seen "Lazy"as a factor in my clients motives for
    hiring me.
    It maybe that people YOU know look down on us..but I have never had that expeirence in my line of work at all.Most respect me and my artistic ability,my hard work and my knowlege in my feild.I have not felt anyone ever looking down on me or my work.So 1st thing you need to do is adjust THAT attitiude..then get your mind in the right place to continue.Please do not take offence..but attitude is so important
     

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