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Zoysia Grass

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by 4-Seasons, Mar 2, 2008.

  1. 4-Seasons

    4-Seasons LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 63

    Anyone have any suggestions on Zoysia grass. Customers back yard is
    about 75ft x 45ft. Says that grass does not grow well. It is pretty shady and probably a lot of clay in durt. Its only me and a partner so sod is out of the question. Never Used Zoysia. If anyone has any comments or prices please advise. Thanks
  2. grassman177

    grassman177 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,795

    zoysia wont tolerate shade at all. if much shade, reseed with a blue fescue blend. definitely aerate it well too to loosen the soil. fertilize. that is a bout it. maybe post a few pics so we know what you have to deal with. thanks
  3. 4-Seasons

    4-Seasons LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 63

    Will try to get some pics up here. They said they spent like $300 on seed and aerated last year. Nothing works. I was looking at the Zoysia Site and it says it grows pretty much anywhere.
  4. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,194

    Sounds like you need to run a soil test. If PH is too low then your fertilizer gets locked up and does not do any turf species any good. Also tell them that you are testing for Zoysia (or whatever turf you are planning to work with). The analysis will vary a little. Follow suggestions from local Ag. Extention Agent in your county.
  5. Mike75

    Mike75 LawnSite Member
    from Texas
    Posts: 39

    SOME zoysia will not grow in shade, and SOME will depending upon how much sunlight the grass will get each day. Most zoysia requires at least 5 hours of direct light, however there are certain varieties that tolerate it better than others. The best zoysia is Zorro and Diamond. I really want to use it myself.
  6. lawnpro724

    lawnpro724 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,201

    Trim the trees and test the soil PH. I would bet that if they have a bunch of trees or a couple large ones the soil PH is going to be low and grass need soil PH to be around 6.5-7. Zoysia will make a great lawn that if maintained will be almost weed proof but you will need to trim the trees so enough sunlight and rain can get through to the lawn.
  7. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    I'd like to know more about zoysia cultivars that tolerate shade. I can promise you that Compadre does not. I haven't seen many that do. I love my zoysia lawn, but I have to do the shady edges in TTTF
  8. 4-Seasons

    4-Seasons LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Posts: 63

    Hi, what do you mean by, "but I have to do the shady edges in TTTF".
  9. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    I mean that in three years of banging my head against the wall trying to get "somewhat shade tolerant" Compadre zoysia to grow on the south edge of my lawn (which is shaded by a forest edge) I gave up. I planted turf type tall fescue, which came in a few days after sowing. It will never be as thick or lush as my zoysia, but I think it will blend okay -- its better than the bare spots I have had for three years.
  10. TScapes

    TScapes LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 453

    Here are some facts that I wanted to share:

    Ranking turfgrass species according to shade tolerance

    Ranking Cool-Season Warm-Season
    Fine Fescue
    Rough Bluegrass
    Annual Bluegrass

    Tall Fescue
    Perennial Ryegrass
    St. Augustinegrass
    Creeping Bentgrass


    As far as different varieties of zoysia, you would probably have to do a search as to what is cold tolerant for your area. I know emerald is more shade tolerant than meyers, but neither can stand the cold that well. Look up your state's ag dept website and see if they have recommendations. Or simply contact some local sod growers or better yet, call some golf course superintendents.

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