2 gas tank ztr's

Dawson

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Valrico, FL
Just bought a new mower with double gas tanks and the little valve you have to turn to switch tanks. What drawback would there be to replacing the little 3way valve manifold with a wide open 3way manifold to just combine the two tanks eliminating the need to switch tanks?

The Dixie choppers I used to run were double tanks but just combined them so you didn't have to mess with switching back and forth which worked fine so not sure why there is any need to complicate things with an extra valve like they all seem to do now?
 

AlohaMowing

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Hilo, HI
why there is any need to complicate things with an extra valve like they all seem to do now?
It may be a liability issue.

If there are two fuel tanks, one on each side, and they are not isolated from one another, when mowing on a side slope fuel can drain from the one on the uphill side into the downhill tank. That can make the mower more unstable and more likely to roll over. If the tanks are isolated from one another it is possible to run off one tank for a while, then switch to the other for a while, to better maintain an equal weight distribution.

If an operator is injured in a roll over when the tanks are not isolated, the manufacturer may try to shift some of the blame on the operator or whoever modified the valve.

It probably will not be an issue for most people, and because the fuel will not drain quickly through the small diameter fuel hose from the high to the low tank there probably will not be a significant shift in weight before one is mowing a different direction and what was the downhill tank will become the uphill tank. Still, because I have some long (like 1/4 mile) sideslope runs I appreciate having a single tank low and centered under the seat of my TTII.
 

flintknapper

LawnSite Senior Member
It may be a liability issue.

If there are two fuel tanks, one on each side, and they are not isolated from one another, when mowing on a side slope fuel can drain from the one on the uphill side into the downhill tank. That can make the mower more unstable and more likely to roll over. If the tanks are isolated from one another it is possible to run off one tank for a while, then switch to the other for a while, to better maintain an equal weight distribution.

If an operator is injured in a roll over when the tanks are not isolated, the manufacturer may try to shift some of the blame on the operator or whoever modified the valve.

It probably will not be an issue for most people, and because the fuel will not drain quickly through the small diameter fuel hose from the high to the low tank there probably will not be a significant shift in weight before one is mowing a different direction and what was the downhill tank will become the uphill tank. Still, because I have some long (like 1/4 mile) sideslope runs I appreciate having a single tank low and centered under the seat of my TTII.
IF you are mowing laterally on a slope so steep that the weight of the fuel becomes an issue then:

1. You have NO business mowing there (its your own darn fault if you tip over).

2. Your mower was designed so poorly as to have a high center of gravity and it should NEVER rely on tank 'balance' for safety.
 

flintknapper

LawnSite Senior Member
Just bought a new mower with double gas tanks and the little valve you have to turn to switch tanks. What drawback would there be to replacing the little 3way valve manifold with a wide open 3way manifold to just combine the two tanks eliminating the need to switch tanks?

The Dixie choppers I used to run were double tanks but just combined them so you didn't have to mess with switching back and forth which worked fine so not sure why there is any need to complicate things with an extra valve like they all seem to do now?
Combining tanks means you never have 'reserve', so watch your fuel level.

Combined lines means IF you have a fuel leak below the level of both tanks, both will siphon completely off. If the leak is higher... then both will leak down to the level of equalization. Either way, you lose fuel from both tanks.

Separate tanks let me 'treat' one tank with a heavy mixture of carb cleaner that I run through it from time to time without it being diluted by the fuel from the other tank.

And remember to shut your fuel valve off when not in use. Main jets/needles on carbs can and do get stuck...and you can flood your engine pretty easily overnight. Believe me.......

Skag Engine.jpg
 

Raisedonadeere

LawnSite Member
Location
Central Kentucky
I have been looking at many different mowers lately. Some of them do not have the valve and the two tanks are tied together. Kubota 1211 for example. One other I can’t remember. Sales guy was featuring it as a selling point. I like the valve. Puts me more in charge.
 

BigFish

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
chesapeake, va
Lotta of the two tank /no valve mowers have a check valve in each tank's hose before the Tee. Stops one from flowing into the other.
 

flintknapper

LawnSite Senior Member
I have been looking at many different mowers lately. Some of them do not have the valve and the two tanks are tied together. Kubota 1211 for example. One other I can’t remember. Sales guy was featuring it as a selling point. I like the valve. Puts me more in charge.
Yeah, but 'sales' people will point out their is AIR in the tires and what a wonderful feature that is. ;)

Like you....I prefer having a 'choice' of what tank to use and why/when.

Hard to imagine the benefit from having both tanks tied together, except if regularly mow for longer than one tank will go....you'd have to actually reach back there and turn a valve.....GASP!
 

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