2018 3500 gas or diesel?

Discussion in 'Trucks and Trailers' started by lawn king, Nov 9, 2017.

  1. brycez28

    brycez28 LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 295

    Depends on your situation. Driving 16-20k miles a year, 2/3 towing 11-14k pounds (which 3/4 ton gas is only rated for with 4.10 gears, which will reduce fuel economy on the gas even more) 4-6+ mpg makes a difference.
     
  2. ZombieCutter

    ZombieCutter LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,165

    No, they don't. The seat timer will not allow it. Oh, you didn't know UPStrucks had a seat timer for QC uses?

    Also, it seems you didn't know International and cummins sell the small motors for class 5 trucks, that are the same exact motor as what goes into the 3500+ pickups, minus ford's and dodge's tunes.

    the same reason I laugh at the crowd that says "the ford 6.0 is junk"....However there are tens of thousands of ambulances running with those motors daily, racking up 300K+ before dying. Maybe if you stop putting on a 500HP tune on a stock motor, they tend to last a while.

    And your standard box UPS truck runs a 4bt.
     
  3. AI Inc

    AI Inc LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 26,813

    Ive got a 6.0 with 223,000 on it. Still runs like a top.
     
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  4. TrainingWheels

    TrainingWheels LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,324

    Nice, did you have to bullet proof it?

    BR,

    ~TW
     
  5. AI Inc

    AI Inc LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 26,813

    no, did injector seals at around 170k and a new ficm last winter.
     
    TrainingWheels likes this.
  6. TrainingWheels

    TrainingWheels LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,324

    Nice that ain't bad at all.

    BR,

    ~TW
     
  7. springfield_pest

    springfield_pest LawnSite Member
    Messages: 132

    I know of two (the only people I personally know) 6.0 fords that have had problems. One has cost half as much as the truck to keep running. Yes the guy has spent 20,000 on service if that truck. He has never added a chip or screwed with the factory settings. The only trailer he has pulled with it was maybe 4,000lb total weight. The other is a 75 year old man that only drove the truck to work and home or pulled a 4 horse trailer with a 350 srw. That one the something took a big greasy #2 and hydro locked number 7 or 8 cylinder. He drove to work nothing happened, nothing over heating, when he hit the starter the rod broke and blew the piston in half wrecking the block.
     
  8. AI Inc

    AI Inc LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 26,813

    mine is an 06. from what ive read that is the yr ford finally got that motor right.
     
  9. springfield_pest

    springfield_pest LawnSite Member
    Messages: 132

    That is possible. Navistar wanted to pull it after a few months.
     
  10. AI Inc

    AI Inc LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 26,813

    The 6.0L is a good engine when it is running properly. It has one main failure that is commonly overlooked and is the cause of most of the big issues this engine has. The oil is the life blood of the 6.0L diesel as the injectors are hydraulically actuated using engine oil to drive them. The oil is run through a low pressure oil pump which pushes oil to the oil filter at about 50-80 psi. Once the oil is filtered it is split. Some of the oil is sent to the rod and main bearings, cam, lifters, rocker arms and other moving parts for lubrication purposes. However, the majority of the oil is used to drive the injectors. It is sent into an oil cooler where the oil is cooled with engine coolant in a liquid to liquid heat exchanger. Than it goes into an oil reservoir that directly feeds the high pressure oil pump. The high pressure oil pump ramps the oil pressure up drastically. It will reach 550 psi on startup and varies according to load and rpm up to 3000 psi under wide open throttle full load.

    Heat is created any time liquids or gases are pressurized. This is how air conditioners work. Heat is created by pressurizing a gas. It turns into a liquid where it is cooled and then evaporated back into a gas. Diesel engines also work this way. The engine takes in cold air and compresses it. As it is compressed it is heated to a point that the injected fuel ignites. Air is hot enough to ignite the atomized fuel. These are just a few examples of how pressurizing creates heat.

    So as far as the 6.0L and oil goes, it has 16 quarts of oil in the sump. Oil is pressurized to 80 psi creating heat than it is supposed to be cooled by engine coolant which is typically 180 degrees. After that, the oil that is at about 80 psi and 180 degrees, is squeezed to over 500 psi minimum for idle and upwards of 3000 psi under severe loads. From there, the oil is fed to the back side of the injectors where it serves several purposes. It is the hydraulic force that forces fuel out of the tip of the injector, it lubricates the injector’s spool valve, and it helps cool the injector which is going to divert more heat into the oil. From there it is returned to the oil pan and starts the process all over again. The amount of oil that flows through the engine is the equivalent of 18 gallons per minute. So if you were paying attention before the system only holds 16 quarts of oil. It is flowing at a rate of 18 gal per minute and is under tremendous pressure and heat.

    So you ask, what fails? First of all the oil filter tends to only last 3-5k miles, then it can go into bypass mode. This means it is not filtering the oil. That is instantly a recipe for disaster but that is just the start. The main issue becomes the oil cooler. It is a very small cooler that is trying to flow 18 gal per minute of oil and on the other side of it, it has to flow enough antifreeze to keep the EGR cooler cool. The problem just became 2 problems even though it is one component failing. The big failure is caused from the coolant side of the oil cooler plugging. Typically this happens from dirty coolant, improper cooling system maintenance, and some sand left in the block from the factory that washes out of the block into the oil cooler. When the coolant side of the oil cooler plugs, it quits cooling the oil and it flows little or no coolant into the EGR cooler. The EGR cooler will quickly fail because now there is 500-1400 degree exhaust flowing through a cooler that is not being cooled. The cooler bakes from the inside out and eventually ruptures causing hot exhaust gasses to enter the cooling system and coolant to enter the exhaust stream. If caught early enough, it will not cause much damage but if it is run too long the coolant level can drop and start to overheat the engine which puts a hurting on an already weak head gasket design. On the other side now, the oil is not getting cooled so it is becoming excessively hot if the oil filter has too many miles it can stop filtering. Now there is over heated, unfiltered oil being compressed to thousands of psi and shoved through the delicate injectors. This can cause rubber seals in the system to bake and come apart, oil pump seals to bake and leak, scoring of injector pintles, scoring and damage to the oil pressure regulator and baking of the oil pressure sensor. As you can see this one component just caused thousands of dollars in damage and you had no indication that it was failing. In severe cases it can turn a check engine light on for oil to coolant temperature excessive variation but usually there is a lot of damage done before the engine light comes on.
     
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