Mikeorl

LawnSite Member
Location
Orlando Fl
No it’s not hacky… you said you provide quality work; if you keep working that way… providing high quality work for fair prices… is it marketable?? Yes. How much so, it may depend on your particular area and demographics. Do you need to be a full- service provider? Maybe not. I’m not a full-service provider; I’m solo and just hit 7 years in the business. The biggest thing is to bring your “A” game every day. It helps to have a good support system ( my dealer is awesome and provides great service and advice for/to me). But as long as you do your best and learn and treat your customers well; you will grow. It’s more the “slow and steady” that wins the race.
 

gardiner

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
MASSILLON OHIO
I believe that there is a market. For edging / string trimming. Only.
With knowing that I'm moving a little slower with ageing. I have not reached out for it. I'm doing a area where most properties are in the 35.00 Weekley service. A lady stopped me asking . just for me to do the string trimming . That she like mowing the lawn. I told her 20 bucks a week.i been doing it for a year now. As I drive my mowing route. I see lots of homeowners. That not edging and trimming. When they mow. Making for easy targets. From a business side. Makes for lower overhead. Not needing a mower or trailer. I also believe that with only offering one service. A full service company can take that customer from you
 

Integrity-LC

LawnSite Member
Location
West Michigan
Im a part time solo guy, I do the usual mow/trim/ blow with the occasional tree trimming. I make it known up front that large cleanups that require haul away I cannot do. If there is somewhere to blow the leaves on their property than I do it, no one has complained. Just be upfront about it.
 

Chineau

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Manitoba, Canada
you're no different than the rest here few bought a landscape/mow/fertilizer company add snow in the winter and heck on your assembly line or what ever.
boot straps, you can do it.
under promise over deliver, collect the money you are owed and pay your self and your bills.
it isn't easy but I will take this over someone else's plan.
 

TruCutLawnCareTX

LawnSite Member
Location
Texas
That’s honestly the smartest way to start. When we started we wanted to offer everything and while thankfully, we never bit off more than we could chew, we definitely lost money on one-off projects that we just didn’t have the experience to bid properly. It’s best to stick with what you know and slowly add other services as you grow and learn.
 

Chineau

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Manitoba, Canada
As you grow be mindful of what you are aiming too grow toward, do you plan to be a solo operator or run a crew?
Cut and trim only or fertilizer and weed control?
Landscaping?
do you have some one doing books how will you bill?
this I think is critical, your cash conversation as you build be mindful of cash flow and using credit to purchase equipment buying for one of jobs not so good.
remember to take a day off once in awhile.
 

Capt J-rod

LawnSite Senior Member
The only thing that would make you a hack is poor quality workmanship. I do HVAC for example. When I went on my own they called me a hack and a scab. I laughed and asked them why and how the name on the truck determined this? If I drive a van and work for a company I am a "skilled tradesman"... If I drive my own truck and do the same exact job, they called me a hack. The guy I was debating said it wasn't a fair comparison because he has 10 vans, an office, and all of his overhead that he has to pay for. My reply was that these were problems that he created for himself. I still run solo in my truck and make plenty of money. If the job is over my head or too big I have made friends with a bigger company and I refer them over. They don't poach the customer and don't have time to mess with the "little stuff" that I gladly grab. Find your niche and work hard. Do great work and keep your image up. Clean truck, nice equipment, polite, and most of all COMMUNICATE WITH THE CUSTOMER!!!!
 

Trees Too

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
USDA Zone 6a
Very new to starting a lawn business.
I've worked in the industry for about 3 years now, so I have novice service experience, but I provide quality work, that customers and the boss are proud of.
Is it hacky to only offer lawn mowing (Trimming, edging, and blowing included) and clean-ups in my first year or two? Is this marketable? What challenges could I run into without starting off as a full-service provider?
I fully intend to get my pesticide/herbicide & Fert licenses ASAP. Almost certainly this winter season or as life permits.
Thanks in advance. I love Lawnsite. :usflag:
All I'd say, is take the TEST for yourself and see where you fall....
 

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