Am I being stupid?

Cross Creek Lawn Care

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Middle Tennessee
Thanks for responding! It's nice to hear from someone in a similar situation. I'll only be driving it through neighborhoods. I went and looked at the mower in person yesterday, he had replaced everything in the mower. It is practically new. I can already buy and sell it for 500 - 1500 dollar profit. I think I am for sure going to get it.

View attachment 460707
Update: I bough the mower. $1900. Almost perfect condition.

Nice looking machine. Congratulations! Please take the time to learn how to operate it safely. Zero-turn mowers can be dangerous, especially going down slopes, particularly the smaller/lighter ones like yours.

You can get a PDF file copy of the operator's manual online if the machine didn't come with one. https://www.toro.com/en/parts/partdetails?id=31689
That’s so exciting! That’s a great deal and I think your estimate of $500-1500 is valid.
Make sure to not overload the hydraulics by towing. Small machines like that have small cooling systems and it will just break them down using them for towing too much. I’d stick to 400lbs on flat ground and 250lbs on hills.

Make sure to check the oil regularly and keep it clean. I don’t think it’s efficient to clean it after each use, make sure to blow it off with a leaf blower though each yard. Sharp blades and a clean deck (or XBlades like mine) make cutting so much easier.

@Freaky Fido Is right, I’ve driven a dozen different machines and a zero turn operates different from anything else. Remember, you control comes solely from the rear wheels, and your traction comes from the weight of the machine. If you are going downhill your weight and therefore your traction and control are on the front wheels which don’t do anything. You also need to always keep both wheels moving to keep from tearing grass, when one wheel is fixed while the other is moving it will turn but rip grass in the process, so use a combination of backwards on one side and forwards on the other, gently. Whenever you are mowing a steep hill, always have an “escape route” for if the wheels slip and you lose control (or if you run out of gas, I’ve definitely never done that……..) so you run into a grassy ditch, not a creek, rocks or a car. Another thing, you roll bar will hit things and cause your front wheels to go up if it gets hung up on things. This made me decide to keep mine down permanently. I did this because my mower is extremely stable on hills, weighing at least double what yours does and having most of they weight right next to the ground so my wheels will lose traction before the center of gravity will be anywhere near outside the wheelbase. If you decide to do this too remember Don’t wear your seatbelt with the rollbar down. That would just trap you underneath in the unlikely occasion you’d roll, rather than being able to bail.

If you have any other questions just holler!
 

Freaky Fido

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Northeast USA
That mower is actually an estate series mower according to Toro, a bit below a full-blown commercial unit, but it should still do well for part time use.
 

SS Lawn Care

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Broken Arrow, OK
No, you're not being stupid. You are learning, and in a position to learn with a good safety back drop. You live at home where your cost of living is covered by your parents. That's the best possible scenario to learn the ropes. I learned the ropes of this business while married with 3 kids, and a mortgage. Go for it! Learn lessons and apply those lessons to future events to build wisdom.
 

parker_horn

LawnSite Member
Location
Aledo, TX
The more you start working on your own push mower, your own ZTR, the more you open yourself up to being a lawnmower mechanic.
Which opens yourself up to another world of $$$.
There are a lot of lazy people who want you to mow their grass.
There's another class of less lazy people who want to mow their own grass, have their own mower, but don't want to work on it.
Learn lessons from fixing your mowers. $$$ made fixing the less lazy peoples problems.
 

Youngandfree

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
VA
The more you start working on your own push mower, your own ZTR, the more you open yourself up to being a lawnmower mechanic.
Which opens yourself up to another world of $$$.
There are a lot of lazy people who want you to mow their grass.
There's another class of less lazy people who want to mow their own grass, have their own mower, but don't want to work on it.
Learn lessons from fixing your mowers. $$$ made fixing the less lazy peoples problems.
Yeah my buddy pays me $100 to service his push mower. I don't like doing it for too many people though.
 

Prestigious1

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
East Peoria, IL
Is your business licensed/registered? Insured? Throw a rock and take out a Mercedes side glass window...$750.00. What? You took out a large bow window?? $3,500.00 and up on those...have an Oop's moment and a small dent in the quarter panel of that Bimmer?? Thousands...

I'm sure you have a work permit right?? Doesn't matter if you're the owner...you're also the employee...and in most states any one under 16 needs to have one. I know you have a IRS TAX number right? You are paying your income taxes right?? Paying your quarterly estimated taxes right?? If you answer no to any of the above, you don't have a business, but merely an illegal renegade hobby...the IRS does not care if you're 13 or 30 or whatever...they want their cut...and they will get it too...with interest for past due accounts.

Oh, your parents knew you were running this side hustle?? Then they're liable as well....so it would seem the money you're spending may have been better spent actually starting a legal company.
 

Prestigious1

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
East Peoria, IL
And please don't take this the wrong way, I applaud your work ethic and enthusiasm!! I wish you all the best!! I just want you to consider a few things that a business must have...all every bit as important as the mower itself.
 

Top Forums



Top