Anything Cleaner/Organic for Phosphorus than Rock Phosphate? & Solve light-green lawn slow growth?

phasthound

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Mt. Laurel, NJ
This is wrong. You can use compost any time of the growing season. No need to core before either.

Sounds well smells like you don't have good finished compost. It should have a earthy smell. Not a manure smell. I would find a better supplier.


FYI there is a lot more to growing great grass then NPK. Don't get too focused on those numbers. Oh and compost is the answer to almost any question in "Organic" lawn care. Embrace it, use it, love it.
I agree 100%!!
 
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roody2333

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
nj
thanks for the replies.

Don't forget about that Purely ORganic, that's a great price, better than milo I think, and some/most/ Home Depots you can order it free pick up at store so you're not paying for heavy shipping.


Maybe "greensand", a natural source of potassium would suit your situation. It would add the potassium that Ocean-gro and Milorganite lack. Greensand is naturally occurring in New Jersey.

I'm looking for Phosphorus. I already added Southern AG sulfate of potash, costly, but definitely the best potassium amendment, could use muriate of potash I know but opted for the sulfate. But not nearly as costly as Rock phosphate. I bet shipping is also a big factor, maybe I can get it special ordered sort of locally and save on shipping.

Southern AG Sulfate = $1.70 a pound, suggests 4 lbs per 1K spring and fall 'if used as the only fertilizer [that has potassium])', = about $35 cost product spring and Fall. Not too too bad, and if already applying milo or something can just throw it in the hopper. But it does have to be watered it.
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
What is the analysis of the potassium sulfate? Did you plan to dissolve it in water to apply it?
I am thinking, that four pounds per thousand is too much at one time --except for bare soil. High salt index. Could burn the grass. I would reduce it to about a pound per thousand sqft and do several smaller applications. Is the product granular--or just crystals or a fine powder?
New Jersey has huge deposits of greensand--high in potassium.

Grass doesn't need much phosphorus--except for new seed. Phosphorus is outlawed in Michigan, Minnesota, the Chesapeake Bay watershed and most times in Florida.
Phosphorus--stimulates high levels of algae in lakes, oceans and rivers.

I hope this helps.

https://www.enewscourier.com/opinio...cle_565f27a0-bcb1-11ea-a411-7bc11d6e6eb2.html
 
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phasthound

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Mt. Laurel, NJ
It is allowed when soil test show it is low and/or when seeding. There are also allowances for P from organic matter.
 
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roody2333

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
nj
What is the analysis of the potassium sulfate? Did you plan to dissolve it in water to apply it?
I am thinking, that four pounds per thousand is too much at one time --except for bare soil. High salt index. Could burn the grass. I would reduce it to about a pound per thousand sqft and do several smaller applications. Is the product granular--or just crystals or a fine powder?
New Jersey has huge deposits of greensand--high in potassium.

Grass doesn't need much phosphorus--except for new seed. Phosphorus is outlawed in Michigan, Minnesota, the Chesapeake Bay watershed and most times in Florida.
Phosphorus--stimulates high levels of algae in lakes, oceans and rivers.

I hope this helps.

PDF for Southern AG Sulfate of Potash says:

LAWNS: If used with other fertilizers: Apply in the Spring and again in the early Fall at a rate of 1 pound per 1,000 sq. ft. This bag will cover 5,000 sq. ft. If used as the sole fertilizer nutrient*: Apply in the Spring and again in the early Fall at a rate of 4 pounds per 1,000 sq. ft. Water in thoroughly after application

*
I have to assume they mean the only source of Potassium, not as if you'd try to grow a lawn without Nitrogen (and Phosphorus being zero).

About 3 weeks ago I added some since it was depleted, but I didn't add much, lawn wasn't dormant or heat stressed, didn't want to apply 4lbs if it won't be used in mid summer. Yes it's like pebbles but probably dissolved.
I put a tad in the Potassium test tube just to see what would happen and got an instant fully-clouded tube, the cloudier the higher K is. My soil tested crystal clear.


About the dark green, milo is known for that from its iron, so I checked youtube for 'years milorganite' results, trying to see who's been using it for years and how the lawn looked. All I'm seeing is how dark green milo is making lawns, and this video he had to actually stop using it after some years because Phosphorus kept tested as surplus. so I think to solve phosphorus I'll just keep using milo (oceangro) and alternate with Purely Organic later on to keep N P and K all good. Using one or the other without causing a surplus.

yea, phosphorus is the worst for the environment in terms of pollution, doesn't matter if it's organic or not, from cattle manure or whatever, can only add it when seeding or tested low. It used to be in everyday synthetic box store fert but they removed it.

I don't know then, maybe the synthetic starter and winterguard has been nullifying the affects of the organic P and K, because I have been using quite a bit of milorganite over the years. In Fall and Spring after a seeding it looks like %100 turf, and quite dark, then the heat comes and gets burnt spots, watering some areas 1 hour all at once twice a week, or two 45 min waterings every 3-4 days, isn't too much so I don't think it's brown patch. Cut on highest height too. I used to think it was the cheap seeds, Tried Titan Rx last Fall is quite drought tolerant, not so much brown patch resistant. Might actually be spots of poa though I'm thinking. I think I'll TORCH those spots first to kill poa seeds if I re-seed this Fall.
 

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