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Are Husqvarna walk behinds any good?

GrasMstr

LawnSite Member
I have a 2002 4215 ETS. It has about 300 hrs on it. It works perfectly for what I use it for. Haven't spent a nickle on it other than a battery.
Looking for a 32 or 36 Hydro right now. I don't know anything about the belt drives.
 

MOHUSTLER

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Missouri
Short answer...no..We have a few crews in town that bought them over what I sell to save a few bucks. We are constantly working on them and they are a bare to work on. If your a homeowner who does not plan on putting serous hours on them then they are probably a fine machine. Just not built like others for extended comercial use.
 

JimQ

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Beatrice, NE
Short answer...no..We have a few crews in town that bought them over what I sell to save a few bucks. We are constantly working on them and they are a bare to work on. If your a homeowner who does not plan on putting serous hours on them then they are probably a fine machine. Just not built like others for extended comercial use.
Hey MoHustler,

What in particular was giving you trouble with the Husqvarna walkbehinds? What made them a PIA to work on? What model are your referring to?

All Husqvarna hydro-walks (fixed and float) were redesigned last year.

Thanks for the info.

Take care,

Q
 

MOHUSTLER

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Missouri
These were 4-5 year old machiens. I have not seen the new ones yet. The problems we faced were many belt breakages spindels and pully problems. And engine issues which I know has nothing to do with husqo. These were also hydro drives with the IZT trans I belive I might be wrong they might have ahd the EZT trans. Which is just a cheaper pump then other companies use. Also not saying the guys were exactly easy on them. But others do hold up a little better to demanding use.
 

JimQ

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Beatrice, NE
These were 4-5 year old machiens. I have not seen the new ones yet. The problems we faced were many belt breakages spindels and pully problems. And engine issues which I know has nothing to do with husqo. These were also hydro drives with the IZT trans I belive I might be wrong they might have ahd the EZT trans. Which is just a cheaper pump then other companies use. Also not saying the guys were exactly easy on them. But others do hold up a little better to demanding use.
Yep, those all sounds like familiar issues with some of the older walks. They must have been fixed deck hydro walks. They had IZT's under them. I believe that model was discontinued a couple of years ago when Hydro-Gear killed the IZT.

Thanks for the info.

Q
 

MOHUSTLER

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Missouri
I would like to make myslef clear that im not flat out bashing husqo. Just relaying the problems that we have seen on them. What changes have you made to your mowers to improve them? I have the upmost respect for any company that can admit they had issues and are willing to fix them. Unlike other companies out today, that takes alot of guts.
 

Mowerman2112

LawnSite Member
I have a Husqvarna Model 7021R with Honda GVC-190 5.1 H.P. The rear wheel drive is good
for inclines and when catcher becomes heavy. Also the all wheel adjustment handle is a plus. Have had no problems, but is lighter duty and deck is on the light side as well. But over all and for the money its been a great mower and gets used alot, run Syn oil in all my
mowers.
 

JimQ

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Beatrice, NE
I would like to make myslef clear that im not flat out bashing husqo. Just relaying the problems that we have seen on them. What changes have you made to your mowers to improve them? I have the upmost respect for any company that can admit they had issues and are willing to fix them. Unlike other companies out today, that takes alot of guts.
Hey don't worry about it. No need to clarify. I know you're just telling it how it is. That's that way it should be. The truth is what it is, no sense in dancing around it.

Spindles, oh boy, what a mess those were for a while. Where to start... The cast aluminum housing had a relatively small mounting circle diameter and no reinforcing ribs. If you hit something solid, you could break the spindle housing (if you were lucky) or bend the deck shell.

The spindle used tapered roller bearings. Tapered rollers are great if you can keep the proper preload on them. If you can't, they eat themselves up in no time. Well, there were preload issues. There were Quality related issues with some of the bearing spacers. This screwed up the preload. Either too tight or too loose. Either way and the bearings were short lived.

There was a dust cap on the bottom of the spindle to protect the bottom bearing. The cap was captured in the stack that determined bearing preload. For a while, these dust caps were made out of the wrong material. The material was too soft. It deformed and the bearings lost preload.

Then there was the "through-drilled" bolt (for a grease zerk) that held the whole assembly together. Sometimes the bolt head would break off, sometimes it would just back-off and loose torque. You know what happened next. Dead spindle.

Idler pulleys - In my opinion, they were just plain old poor quality. Low quality bearings and no dust/splash shields.

All of that has changed in the last few years. There has been a huge push to improve product design and quality. If you were to look at a picture of the Engineering and Quality teams from 5 years ago and then one from today, you'd see very few familiar faces. That's a mixed blessing, I know, but I can tell you without a doubt, we're better today than we've ever been before.

A new spindle has been developed as a drop in replacement for the old spindle. It has an improved housing with reinforcing ribs, the material of the dust shields has changed and the assembly is not held together with a large nut instead of the problematic bolt that was used before. The redesigned spindle assembly is reliable now.

Moving forward with new product, the commercial spindle has been totally redesigned. It's the exact opposite of the one it replaces. Cast Iron, 10" mounting circle diameter, larger shaft diameter, greaseable ball bearings. It's basically bombproof. You'll find it on the PZ now.

The idlers were an easy fix. We started using the best quality idlers available. Yep, they're also the most expensive but there are some things you just can't skimp on.

I think we have a much better understanding of the needs of a commercial cutter. As a result, our design and testing requirements have increased dramatically.

I know Husqvarna has probably earned some of the bad reputation we have in the commercial turf care industry but we're working hard to make it right. Check out some of the new products when you get the chance. I hope you like what you see.

Sorry for some of that fluffy crap in there towards the end. :laugh:

Q
 

Bigler Lawn Care

LawnSite Member
Location
Valencia PA
got a wh4817 and honestly can say it run if not out runs my lesco's toro's scag's and is side by side with the turf tracers but i feel the husky provides a better mow than the turf tracers but the tracers have more pulling power i feel
 
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