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AT101 / K472 tires? Wheel spacers?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing Equipment' started by Envy Lawn Service, Sep 20, 2017.

  1. Mickhippy

    Mickhippy LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,295

    Sounds like your weather patterns are as messed up as ours. Was speaking to my friendly dealer last week. He was saying a lot of guys, including himself, struggling ATM due to the semi drought. Was the driest winter in decades.
    Just never know what each Spring will bring. This one's been dry, last year was good, year before was dryish and so forth. A lawnie friend had a good last season but off to a very slow start this year.
    I really dont miss that part of the business, the insecurity of it especially when payments and bills keep coming.
    I hope you can make enough back over winter to cover the losses. Man, going into winter under funded sux balls! lol
     
    hort101 likes this.
  2. Ridin' Green

    Ridin' Green LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from Michigan
    Messages: 23,233

    Yep it does. I have other avenues for income though, so not totally dependent on mowing. I have a few places that are irrigated regularly, but most aren't so the mowing has slowed to a crawl right now. The up and down pattern for the temps isn't helping anything either. the grass doesn't know whether to green up or turn brown and go dormant LOL
     
    hort101 likes this.
  3. sjessen

    sjessen LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from Knoxville, Tn
    Messages: 24,207

    Envy, I just came across this thread and have some input on spacers. One inch spacers should be fine but two inch ones caused repeated bearing failures at about 800 hours. I have run spacers on several Exmarks if brand mattters.
     
    Walker56, Ridin' Green and hort101 like this.
  4. OP
    OP
    Envy Lawn Service

    Envy Lawn Service LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,106

    Thanks, that helps a bunch. Brand wouldn't really matter. If it's got pumps and wheel motors the end result is gonna be the same on two different mowers of the same weight. The bearings can't tell what brand mower is on them.

    I flipped some wheels once and had a huge additional width change with no issues. But that mower was not near as heavy. So to me that didn't count. That's why I was looking for a response like yours, thanks!
     
    sjessen and hort101 like this.
  5. OP
    OP
    Envy Lawn Service

    Envy Lawn Service LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,106

    I wanted to update this old thread as I saw a few more come along over the time that it took me to finally get around to getting fed up and pulling the trigger.

    I bought 4 tires and put them on myself, which was a bear. But I got it done, and I have to clarify that I have experience doing this because places around here won't touch anything under like 14" unless it's a little trailer tire because they don't have the equipment for it, and and little trailer tires are not all that bad because they are like a car tire.

    I do not recommend tackling it yourself unless you have a bead breaker and 3 tire spoons and a little experience. This is because the tires are so wide and the bell of the wheels is really shallow. So it is some work.

    Anyways, I can tell you with no doubt I wish I had done this from day one with mowers. Especially zero turns. They are so much better that I won't ever own another mower that does not have them on, and that will limit some because the sizing is limited. This tire design and tread pattern was designed for zero turn mower and those skid steer 6 wheel amphibious things... and now that I have put them on and used them I totally understand.

    My hunch was right that most of the issues I saw with turf tires was due to lack of traction. These have solved all of the complaints I have had as far as traction, turning and stuff like that, like mowing a pattern how I want to or have to vs how I can mow it without skids or spins or turf damage from turning. All my problem spots are already healing.

    These have so much traction that they don't ever slip. So they don't tear the turf. If they do you have really screwed up driving and the turf damage will be a small couple cuts from like 2 of the bars. In real soft ground it will kind of hoe it up. But it don't kill it and you can walk it back down fine. There are none of those 12x12 instant bald patches where the turf rips off at the ground. The only thing I have found I can not do is the quick little cheater turns, where you turn with one side and just let the inside tire neutral roll and slide a little. I used to have some places where I would get to the end and kind of arc turn into the next pass, then stop and reverse one tire to whip it around into line to make that next pass. I used to do these all the time where slipping was an issue. Now I can just zero turn 90, drive to the center and zero turn 90 again or 2 arc turns.

    The only application I would not recommend these for is if you mow total crap-holes. Like places with lots of bare patches, mossy places, etc. Like if you have a lot of lawns that have too many trees and not enough turf maintenance to keep the grass and you are just there to knock it down when it needs it. Those places you will have to be more careful and it will cost you a little time.

    The only thing I haven't quite figured out yet is my air pressure. I just keep letting air out of them. I bet you could run 5 or 6 PSI in these or less if you had real soft marshy stuff to deal with. They should float right over anything your casters don't sink up in. I have a patchy corner at my house because of the cypress trees and I keep looking at my tracks in the dirt and letting a pound out. What do you guys run?

    Oh, and I almost forgot, these don't track anything all over either or get crap stuck in the tread like turf tires either. But if you have some concrete that needs washing, you'll see it next week. It's like the bar treads crush whatever crud makes it a slightly darker shade and you'll see little tractor tracks the next week if it rains in between lol. But overall nice not to track lawn stuff on the concrete or asphalt. And not to smell dog or cat poo until it all comes out of the tread. If you work out of an enclosed or park in a closed building not tracking that smell back with you is well worth the cost of the tires, lol.
     
    hort101 and Ridin' Green like this.
  6. Ridin' Green

    Ridin' Green LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from Michigan
    Messages: 23,233

    Great post! Totally agree with all of it and have said so in some of the more recent AT threads.

    As for PSI- I found I can run 1 lb more than my turf tires, get a better ride due to the much more rounded sidewalls, and at the 13 psi mark vs 12 for the turf tires, my pitch remains the same on my deck.:)
     
    hort101 likes this.
  7. OP
    OP
    Envy Lawn Service

    Envy Lawn Service LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,106

    Well, I for one hate tire specs. I think they should have to be the size stated. But more often than not, they are not. So I really screwed up because I waited and replaced all 4 tires at the same time and decided to get all 4 Carlisle. Well it turns out their caster tires are a good bit smaller than Kenda fronts. So my stuff is all out of whack now. Cut height is way off, deck pitch of course depends on pressures.

    Had I known this going into it, I might have gotten the Kenda version of the same tires. But I didn't know anyone that did either brand front or rear to ask to guide my purchase. My Kenda fronts are so old, new ones may not be the same anyways.

    I will try 13 psi and see where I am. They seem very flexible on air pressure. The turf masters I always ran 10 or 12 psi depending on the weather. 10 psi most of the time and that was about all the range they had. Tread wear was obvious directly in line with the bead of the rim.
     

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