Balance grinding wheel

Discussion in 'Magna-Matic' started by Beckerro, Aug 14, 2019.

  1. Beckerro

    Beckerro LawnSite Member
    Messages: 3

    I have a Model 9000 for about a year. I feel that the grinding wheel needs to be balanced.
    How would I do that?
     
  2. DXN1EL

    DXN1EL LawnSite Silver Member
    from TEXAS
    Messages: 2,298

    Have you tryed a grinding wheel diamond dresser?
    Something like this
     
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  3. OP
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    Beckerro

    Beckerro LawnSite Member
    Messages: 3

    I will and I have that item. I guess I use that on the flat part of the wheel not the angled part of the wheel which has formed from a year of sharpening blades?
     
  4. DXN1EL

    DXN1EL LawnSite Silver Member
    from TEXAS
    Messages: 2,298

    Just remember if you need to change the wheel to do the "ring test"
     
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  5. rlitman

    rlitman LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,296

    Here's what I can tell you about smaller (not car tire) sized grinding stones: they don't need "balancing". And more importantly, the don't need re-balancing.

    If the stone is properly centered on the shaft (i.e. the bushing fits well), and the grinding surface is not irregular, then there shouldn't be any vibration. Normal usage will cause a washboarding on the surface that should be dressed off. If the surface is allowed to get sufficiently cupped out of round, then you'll not only feel vibration in what you're grinding, but eventually in the grinder itself too. So, when that happens, you just dress the wheel.

    The ring test is VERY important for all stone wheels that are either being newly mounted, or that have experienced an impact in-use. It's the only good way to tell if a wheel isn't going to fly apart on you at deadly speeds when run.
     
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  6. rlitman

    rlitman LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,296

    You don't dress the sides of a wheel. You use the dresser to re-form the cutting surface to the flat that it was originally by removing material from the wheel.

    Oh, and because you're rapidly eroding the wheel, expect a LOT of dust to be created.
     
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  7. DXN1EL

    DXN1EL LawnSite Silver Member
    from TEXAS
    Messages: 2,298

    @rlitman have you or anyone else have experince with a flap wheel on a bench grinder?
    I dont own a bench grinder. But i do like those flap disks on my 7" angle grinder.
     
  8. rlitman

    rlitman LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,296

    None here. I do use the 5" flap discs in my angle grinder from time to time, and have flap wheels for my Walter Linemate linisher. On bench mounted equipment, my "soft" wheel experience is mostly with Scotchbrite wheels (these are AWESOME!!!), but also Cratex (rubberized stone), and all sorts of buffing wheels, but never flap wheels.

    Of course flap discs can't be ring tested, but did you know they CAN be dressed? You can run the flap disc in your angle grinder and bring it at right angles up against your spinning bench grinder wheel to grind back the hard backer when too much is exposed.
     
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  9. Magna-Matic

    Magna-Matic Sponsor
    Messages: 844

    Hello All,

    So first we have to define BALANCE vs OUT-OF-ROUND.

    So if a grinding wheels is simply out of balance there simply could be a heavier spot in the grinding wheel creating some vibration.

    If the wheel appears egg shaped or "out-of-round" that means the wheel was mis-used and now will hop or bounce against the mower blade when you grind.

    An out of balance wheel will sometimes correct itself with use as you use up the area that may have had a "heavy spot" in the wheel that was causing the vibration. If you would like to send the wheel in to us we can balance it and return it to you. A balancer is required to do this job.

    If the wheel is out-of-round - this is often caused when the mower blade is not held flat to the "blade rest" or "worktable" when an operator holds the blade off of the "worktable" or allows the blade to chatter between the wheel and "worktable" this will cause a wheel to become out-of-round. This can be corrected by "dressing."

    Dressing a wheel is typically done for two primary reasons:
    1. A wheel was mis-used (made out of round, or glazed)
    2. A special cutting profile is needed on the wheel to do a specific job

    Wheels from Magna-Matic are softer than normal "bench grinder" wheels - so you can dress them with an old lawn mower blade. Make sure to pick a blade you will no longer use and that has nice flat area around the mounting hole. Hold the blade very solid and flat to our "worktable" and lightly push the blade into the wheel - hold it there until there are no more sparks. The slightly push into the wheel again until you get some light sparks. Repeat this process. You will basically be wearing down the high spots or egg shaped portion of the wheel.

    During this process you will most likely see the sparks be intermittent - in other words while you are hold the blade in that one spot - you see sparks going on/off/on/off - this is also confirmation the wheel was out of round. Once you grind and see the same amount of sparks coming off the wheel with no additional pressure into the wheel you will know it is round again.

    I must also note - during this process you will not be going back and forth against the wheel during this dressing/grinding. You simply put a little pressure into the wheel on a flat portion of the blade and hold it there. This should all be done with light pressure - do not push hard.

    If anyone has further questions or needs help with this process feel free to give me a call 800-328-1110

    Thank you,
     
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    Beckerro

    Beckerro LawnSite Member
    Messages: 3

    Thanks for the great explanation
     

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