Be prepared. Neonics under review by EPA

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by phasthound, Feb 12, 2020 at 1:44 PM.

  1. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 5,976

    hort101 likes this.
  2. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,971

    Saw the fine print. Spray applications to turf. It is the same thing all over again. Be it Organophosphates, Carbamates, etc. The EPA exposure scenario was calculated based on a spray application not watered in. Of course children would be exposed to high levels of a pesticide if a product were to be sprayed on grass and not watered in immediately.
     
    Mark Oomkes likes this.
  3. OP
    OP
    phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 5,976

    "Same old thing" Not with this EPA, they have been removing and weakening many regulations. I was surprised to see them strengthen any regulations.

    I'm not sure why one would water in a spray application immediately?
    The product is supposed to dry on the plant and then we are required leave signs telling people to Stay off Lawn for 24 hours.

    Anyway, I believe the rationale behind this is to protect pollinators.
     
  4. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,971

    The pesticides division of the EPA left by Clinton and Obama is still mostly there. There is not a massive turn over in staff. I would not be surprised if the workers that started the FQPA are still there. I am not that naive. I read that document you posted a link to. It is all about human exposure.

    If you are spraying Imidacloprid or any other product that needs to get into the root zone of the turf, not watering it in exposes that product to sunlight and air, causing it to degrade and possibly losing efficacy. Having said that, I now understand why products for golf turf are so easily approved. If an application needs watered in it gets done. I could not imagine leaving Isazofos(Triumph) or Fenamiphos(Nemacur) in the hands of your average American lawn applicator because he would stick his sign in the lawn and drive away.
     
  5. That Guy Gary

    That Guy Gary LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,358

    So they'll ban it, we start using one of the other neonics, and then they ban that too?

    Is that the process for turf chemicals?
     
  6. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,971

    Yes or they look at an entire class of chemistry like how they did OP and Carbamate pesticides.
     
    Mark Oomkes likes this.
  7. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,971

    This pollinator issue would not even be on the radar had that lawn care operator not sprayed trees in full bloom in the daytime with Safari(Dinotefuran). EPA listens more to activist groups than businesses. It has been that way since Clinton. How else did something so ridiculous as the FQPA even get passed.
     
    walkinonwater27 and Mark Oomkes like this.
  8. TurfWerks

    TurfWerks LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 348


    We use Imidicloprid as a soil drench for some shurbs and spray it on lawns for grub prevention. Both applications we recommend watering in.
    We do spray it on landscape occasionally for foliage absorption but are not spraying plants with active blooms or when bees are foraging. I know here in SC Clemson is big on educating bee protection.
     
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  9. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,971

    Imidacloprid on foliage is not a great application to me. Short residual. Unnecessary exposure to bees. Most of my shrub applications are soil injections. Soil applications to turf are watered in by myself. I do not wait for rain or the next irrigation cycle.
     
    kemco and walkinonwater27 like this.
  10. OP
    OP
    phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 5,976

    Some people are in favor of environmental protection.
     

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