Best motorized backpack for spraying smaller lawns.

Ijustwantausername

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
Raleigh NC
I know their are a zillion threads on this, but all are relatively old and every product link that anyone suggested was expired when I clicked on it.

Greendoctor, American lawns, Riggle etc. please feel free to chime in

Thanks all!
 

gregory

LawnSite Bronze Member
i have 2 surflo srs600. they work pretty good. i dont think they have the pressure that the fastpac has... i was going to buy a fastpac when one of my srs600 takes a dump....

greendoc's backpack is no joke...
 

Turf Dawg

LawnSite Gold Member
SP and Maruyama are probably the best gas powered ones. But unless it is your main sprayer that gets used alot the prices are high, so that is why I have the Maruyama knock off from China made by the Wish Plant Protection [or something like that]. These put out enough pressure and volume that you can fog, spray trees about 30' or put on a hand boom and still have recirculation in the tank.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/SP-Systems-Motorized-Backpack-Sprayer-6-2-Gal-/280666149550?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item41590192ae
 

greendoctor

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Honolulu, Hawaii
A Solo 433 fitted with a 3 nozzle boom, secondary regulator and 11004 tips will apply 1 gallon per 1000 all day long. From what I understand, the engine for it was upgraded from the in house design 2 cycle to a Honda GX25 4 cycle. Those are nice engines. I upgraded my Maruyama MS074 with that after the 2 cycle engine it came with said when after years of hard use. For the longest time, the MS074 put in a 5 hour day almost 7 days a week.

An engine drive backpack is one of the better tools for lawns that are hard to access with either a hose or ride-on sprayer. It is also good for shrub and ornamental care. It is very convenient to have a specific solution for the situation at hand rather than being committed to 50-100-200 gallons of something. Same is true of lawns. If you are spraying both warm season and cool season grass or different types of warm season grass, a specific mix is a good thing.
 
OP
Ijustwantausername

Ijustwantausername

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
Raleigh NC
Thanks for all the replies, the Solo's look really nice.

My next question, for almost the same money, I could get the 9 gallon drop in sprayer for my Lesco #80. What would you do and why?

I would mainly be spraying lots about .25-.5 acres in size, and the occasional .75-1 acre lot for broadleafs, etc. I don't have the business to justify a skid just yet.
 

Turf Dawg

LawnSite Gold Member
I do not want to sound rude because I truely am not, but really only you can answer that. Everybodys needs are different. If your lawns are square and without many trees, landcsape beds, islands and things like that that drop in would be nice. If your lawns are not square, have slopes, trees and landscape beds the backpacks are nice because you get into way more spaces.

As far as price goes you asked about the best sprayers and they are expensive, however you can get gas powered sprayers cheaper than the ones mentioned. I gave 150 for my Chinese made Maruyama cloan used and you can find them new on Ebay evrey now and then new for around 300. Echo makes a pretty nice 4gallon gas backpack for around 500. Fast Pack makes a real nice 4gallon electric one also.
 

greendoctor

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Honolulu, Hawaii
Thanks for all the replies, the Solo's look really nice.

My next question, for almost the same money, I could get the 9 gallon drop in sprayer for my Lesco #80. What would you do and why?

I would mainly be spraying lots about .25-.5 acres in size, and the occasional .75-1 acre lot for broadleafs, etc. I don't have the business to justify a skid just yet.
There is a reason why I will not use any kind of electric spray device. No bypass agitation and diaphragm pumps that are not meant to handle suspended solids. Many times, I am applying materials that are not water clear liquids. I also have a very specific requirement for pressure and volume. My lawn applications go down at 1 gallon per 1000 sq ft and at 40 PSI maintained at the nozzle or boom. I started out just using the Maruyama MS074. That machine was running every day of the week, several hours a day my first year in business. I even sprayed a 1 acre lawn at 1 gallon per 1000 that year. A 3 nozzle boom dropping 1.2 GPM at 40 PSI made it such that it took me longer to keep the tank filled than to spray 7,000 sq ft. The skid sprayer was bought when I got calls to do areas over an acre and many trees in one place.

Turf Dawg is also right about considering how accessible your lawns are. If you saw most of the lawns I deal with, you would cry. No way to get something on wheels to it because the only way to get to it is down stairs, up hill or between the house and a fence with barely enough room to walk. Irregular shapes. Obstacles. Even if a lawn is open, I normally have hedges and beds completely surrounding the lawn. BS if I am going to drive a Z Spray through someone's bed of tropical foliage. A hose is often a PITA unless I am either applying to a lawn over 20,000 sq ft or I am making an application that requires 5 or more gallons per 1000. The engine drive backpack is terrific when treating gardens, shrubs and hedges because a hose can easily cause more damage than what you are spraying for.
 
OP
Ijustwantausername

Ijustwantausername

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
Raleigh NC
No bypass agitation and diaphragm pumps that are not meant to handle suspended solids.
Greendoctor, what do you mean by this as I am fairly new to spraying and its terminology Are you saying the drop-in doesn't have these? How much agitation would I need if I only plan on using liquid herbicides? thanks
 

Turf Dawg

LawnSite Gold Member
Some chemicals stay mixed for quite some time and some do not. Several of the electric powered sprayers do not have enough volume [GPM] to offer good recirculation. Most electric will shut off when you quite spraying and the pressure builds up and nothing goes back to the tank. On the gas powered units, they put out enough volume that some of the mix is going back to the tank while you are spraying and when the engine is running and you are not spraying all the mix is going back to the tank.
The Gregson Clark Spreader Mate does have recirculation while it is being used. As long as you are spraying some is going back to the tank. I also think you can cut off the boom and recirculate everything to the tank and get everything mixed before you spray.
The more things you use sprayers for the more agitation you need. Some people spray pretty much everything -- fert, pre m, post, fungicide, ect.... Myself, my main thing is post herbicides that do not require much agitation. I use granular fert and pre. The only thing I have to be careful of is Simazine when using my Permagreen, it is ok when using my gas powered backpack because it has good agitation and the mix is not near as concentrated.
 

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