best time to prune deciduous trees

Discussion in 'Tree Climbing, Pruning, Felling' started by Guest, Oct 6, 2008.

  1. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
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    me too. I ve been on arb sites for a few years now. don t mind mixing it up a little as otherwise it can get boring. .....Joe: "blah blah blahblah...........Mike: yeah you re right Joe, couldn't agree more. Also blah blah blahblahblah blah!......Joe:....That is so true Mike. (borrrrrrring:D)
     
  2. OP
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    Guest

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    I realize tree companies prune 12 months a year, but if you had your choice...what is your favorite time to prune "non-evergreen" trees? (like it was your own property) My favorite time is September/October here in the midwest. Reasons....you can still see which branches are dead (cuz leaves are pretty much still on live branches), and you are less likely to spread diseases.

    I know pruning companies need regular income....otherwise you might as well stand at an intersection with a sign that says "need money for food". :laugh:

    So what's your favorite time to prune? rscvp, thanks :dancing:
     
  3. OP
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    Guest

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    Good point regarding flowering woody plants. Had a customer this week wanting his huge (French hybrid) lilac pruned. I asked him how important the blooms were....he chose to wait 'til just after spring blooming.
     
  4. OP
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    Guest

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    Dr. Shigo (along with Dr. Bob Partyka) helped train us old ChemScapers back in the late 70's & early 80's. Those men knew their stuff.

    A large tree company here is doing radio ads now...they say now is the best time to prune trees such as oaks & elms to minimize disease infection. Of course, most pruning companies prune year around anyway.
     
  5. OP
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    Bob Partyka was ChemScape's full-time guru, but Alex & he often held seminars for ChemScape. (Dr Partyka also passed away a couple of years ago).

    I was in on the 'ground floor" when ChemLawn's tree/shrub division (ChemScape) was getting started. I was involved with both these gentlemen regarding micronutrient treatments and scale insect controls for woody ornamentals. I still have an original ChemScape manual.

    I also remember Dr Shigo's research regarding "branch collars" and the healing capabilities within them. Also proper treatment (often non- treatment) of decayed wood in trees. Dr Shigo figured out that "orange shellack" was not always the best answer...instead, he often recommended that no products be applied....clean out the loose bark & decay so the trees could heal naturally. I remember he hated seeing homeowners use cement, tar, tin, etc to close off a cavity in a tree.

    This stuff goes back thirty years, but it still holds true today. (I have been scolded on lawnsite for bringing up thirty-year old stuff, but I never backed down cuz I knew it still holds true today)
     
  6. OP
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    treevet, "Within the branch collar is a narrow cone of cells called the 'branch defence zone'. These cells activate the growth of 'woundwood', the callus tissue that grows over the pruning cut." source: Colrado State University

    Note: Activating the growth of woundwood = healing. IMO :waving:
     
  7. OP
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    Guest

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    Now you are picking on other members cuz they did not read the same "books" that you did.. That ain't right. If you think that reading books is the best way to gain experience so as to criticize members', you have alot to learn. IMO Also..I proved you WRONG regarding branch collars...never heard an apology or feedback from ya??.

    Then you were assuminmg that Dr Shigo was the best expert in the USA. We all know he was a knowedgable man, but was he the ONLY expert? I met him, and I met others. I know there were others as well .....Do you?. Nobody's perfect -- not even Dr. Shigo.

    I say, get out of your truck and make a difference. My 2 cents worth.
     
  8. OP
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    treevet -- sorry i flew off the handle. it was wrong, and i apologize. *trucewhiteflag*
     
  9. OP
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    Guest

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    I over reacted, and Mason (my right hand man) was here helping to fuel the fire --- he's a lawn dog and is used to lawnsite where folks often go head to head. But I was responsable. Thanks for accepting my apology. Larry.

    p.s. I forgot much of my horticultural knowledge over the years cuz I am now more of a "general manager" (owner) of a business. So I look at numbers instead of what I truly love (woody ornamentals). Tough deal, so from now on...I'll look forward to your, flying squirrel's, etc info.

    But if I see something I don't like, I might let folks know...probably at the same time making a fool of myself. :laugh:
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Guest

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    Flowering tree get pruned right after they finish flowering, non flowering get pruned normally when the tree is dormant (best time). Maples would be an exception, if you prune them to late in the dormat season they will bleed in the spring. You have the right idea though late sept and oct aint bad. Aint the best but aint bad.
     

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