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Can you guys give me some input on these aereators. Im in the market for one.
 

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I was running them both last week while training sales personnel. The best way for me to teach is to show people how to run the respective units and let the units speak for themselves. I'll give you some features to watch for but I can't stress strongly enough to ask for demonstrations of the units. I can set up one (Billy Goat AE401 Series) for you if your dealer has trouble getting one for you. Unfortunately, you're on your own to get a demo on a Ryan.

No front water drum. Our unit has the water above the tines. This ensures that the weight is properly located above the tines to get the deepest plug of similarly powered competitive units. Drums are also poor for ramp traction, and will eventually leak and drain the very weight they are supposed to offer.

Four wheel design. Our unit is stable on hillsides and can be used with ramps. Competitive units with center wheels or drums are like 3-wheel ATV's in that they are inherently unstable on hillsides.

Pillow Block bearings. We use 6 cast iron pillow block bearing with grease zerks. This ensures the unit will be around for years to come and make you money year after year. Competitors use needle bearings or inexpensive stamped steel flange bearings.

Ease of use. To pull our tines out of the ground simply lift the handle and the bale flips to a locked position and holds the tines out of the ground until you want to re-engage them. Competitive units have you grabbing the bale every time. This takes your hand off of the handles an consumes time and energy.

There are many other features but running the units side by side will truly let you see which one is better.

Let me know if you have any other questions I can answer for you.
 

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Thanks Drew, I do need to do a demo but my local dealer claims the Billy Goat is more difficult to turn than the 'Ryan' water drum type units. He indicated pulling the tines out of the ground were essentially the same design and the same amount of difficulty. I was excited to see the unit after I read the article in Turf magazine last night. I worry about feeling beat up after a day of running a Ryan. I'm looking at the Plugr as a unit that is easier to run. The split drive units also are suppose to be easy to turn.

In my case I mean turning the unit 180degrees - a complete change of direction. Is there something my local deal could be doing wrong?
 

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its personal choice i used both and liked the ryan i bought 2 of them and i have an old one from 20 years a go that still runs strong. the billy goat is smaller but my dealer said they were comming out with a bigger one soon i guess nothing bad to say my guys like machines they already know. i also found ryan to be cheaper
 

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DBsoccer,

What I am always amazed at is how dealers who are the people who landscapers count on to recommend product many times have not actually run the equipment themselves. If he had it wouldn't have said what you indicated. Many times there's no one to man the counter while they try a new piece of equipment or there's nowhere near that the dealer can try it at. Even worse some of the Distributor salespeople don't trailer the equipment to do the dog and pony show to train the dealer on the benefits. The more of a specialty product it is the more this is true.

The Plugr is a good unit, it's lack of weight makes it relatively ineffective against all but perfect soil. It really nice in perfect soil though. Dry soil or soil with rocks can cause big problems with vibration and repairs. Split drives are also nice but invariably tear the turf unless you pull the tines to turn around. Where's the benefit though? They are also a little more expensive with fewer tines as they have a split tine system.

If you want me to set up the distributor assisting your dealer to show an AE feel free to PM me. Please let me know if there are any other questions.

Drew
 

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Have you looked at the Tufco TurnAer Aerators. They turn using your index fingers to pull a snow mobile brake lever. They lift them selves out of the turf and have rubber front tires for transport and loading. Fast effective, pull great cores and you can ride behind them on a sulky. So easy some say it is fun to aerate with them.
http://turfco.com/
 

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The AE401H is the newest BG model. But BG has been producing aerators for awhile, I am assuming. A quick search of the web reflects some models with casters. Can someone briefly comment on BG history? I spoke with one guy this AM who has an older BG aerator that he loves. I don't know if it has casters or not. His claim is it is heavier than the Pluggr and, therefore, pulls a better plug. He also claims it is easy to use. Harder than mowing but easier than running a wheel type Ryan.

Can someone provide a history and is the AE401H the only currently available BG?
 
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