Blowouts

Discussion in 'Winterizing' started by GreenLawn51, Jul 21, 2019.

  1. Andrew H

    Andrew H LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,778

    When you guys do winterizing, do you have a sign that says
    “ sprinkler blowouts starting at such and such price”
     
  2. Tonset

    Tonset LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 268

    There’s a company in my area that spams every job and every traffic stop with yard signs. Seems to work, charges flat $25. I’m not even going to try and compete with that. He subs a portion out to guys with Honda Civics loaded up with a pancake compressor in the trunk. You get what you pay for.

    I like the mention of blowing thru the pipes. I’ve seen a homeowner using a shop vac at the bpv. He had the poppet and bonnet removed to do it. Where’s the hammering head emoji?
     
  3. OP
    OP
    GreenLawn51

    GreenLawn51 LawnSite Member
    Messages: 29

    Just trying to take care of a few of my good customers. Most of the heads are a rotor mount from below. Biggest one is 12 zones. A lot of them have a blowout connector roadside, while some are through a backflow in a crawlspace or utility closest. Blowout connectors have a valve on them, backflows are threaded male and female 1/4" npt, and a few backflows have a hose spigot type connector. Just wondering what you guys run for pressures and times. IE, 10' of hose off the compressor vs. 150 of hose off compressor. What times/pressures are you runnning through the drip lines? Looking at renting a commercial tow behind compressor for a week. Thanks for any info
     
  4. Mdirrigation

    Mdirrigation LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,393

    If they're that good of a customer I highly suggest you leave the blowout joint irrigation contractor with experience experimenting can cost you money
     
  5. magna111

    magna111 LawnSite Senior Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 487

    And could lead to losing customers if you blow it out poorly and they have problems in the spring, or over do it and blow heads apart. And I can’t see how you’re going to make any money renting a compressor for a week to do 12 blowouts.

    Stick to what you know, you’re hurting us by stealing our work, you’re hurting your customers by charging them for what amounts to a diy service on what could be their most important irrigation service of the season, and you’re hurting yourself wasting your time and reputation doing something you don’t know what you’re doing. Besides, most decent landscapers around here are too busy with seeding, aeration, fall fertilizing and leaf cleanups to chase down a few bucks on blowouts.
     
    AI Inc and Mdirrigation like this.
  6. Tonset

    Tonset LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 268

    You know I wouldn’t claim anyone is stealing work. I would say it’s a lost opportunity.

    Anyway, having worked for an irrigation contractor for 4 years over 20 years ago I would recommend you ride along with a more experienced company for a day. Then pick another company to ride along with for a day. Free help to them and you will learn quick. I say it is a must to shadow at least two companies because just because they claim to be a professional you will soon find out everyone makes mistakes. And mistakes are one way of learning.

    I had a shadow last season, happy to help. He had about 25 to do so we ended up adding them to my list. He paid me for them while learning about his customers systems and proper tools for different jobs. Many of my customers DO NOT want to chase down multiple companies to service their property. I’m sure others have heard that as well.
     
  7. magna111

    magna111 LawnSite Senior Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 487

    In my state you need to be licensed to do irrigation work, that includes blowouts. Unlicensed guys ARE stealing work from licensed guys.
     
    Prefectturfnj likes this.
  8. Tonset

    Tonset LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 268

    Well you better call the cops and file a report for having work stolen.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    GreenLawn51

    GreenLawn51 LawnSite Member
    Messages: 29

    As far as drip lines go. I've seen some with a removable cap at towards the end of them, and then others seem to be one continuous line. I've also seen plastic on/off ball valves leading to them. What's the idea behind this?
     
  10. Delmarva Keith

    Delmarva Keith LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 750

    The caps are for periodic flushing. The valves are there to regulate flow rate.
     

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