Blowouts

Discussion in 'Winterizing' started by GreenLawn51, Jul 21, 2019.

  1. Love the Green Biz

    Love the Green Biz LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,753

    Well, duh. Cost of living is a factor. To answer the question asked I was not tasked to adjust my numbers for other areas-simply to supply an answer to the question.

    Right over your head.
     
  2. Andrew H

    Andrew H LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,781

    We should video chat because at this moment I am bowing to your wisdom oh wise one
    So instead of telling him how you came up with the number you just state it, good work let’s teach that with everything but then no one will ever learn anything.

    I was just answering your question oh wise one.
     
  3. Michael J. Donovan

    Michael J. Donovan Head Moderator, Online Communities Staff Member
    Messages: 4,532

    stay on topic and refrain from the back and forth, uncalled for, attacks on one another
     
    Andrew H likes this.
  4. Andrew H

    Andrew H LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,781

    Is cost of living the only factor oh wise one?

    Again the numbers are meaningless, you asked why they were meaningless I answered, you didn’t like the answer and got your panties in twist.

    It’s too bad not all New Yorkers aren’t as wise as you
     
  5. Love the Green Biz

    Love the Green Biz LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,753

    I see you posted before seeing MJD step in. Water under the bridge all.
     
  6. Love the Green Biz

    Love the Green Biz LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,753

    The average going rate for a residential blowout around these parts is $75 and up. How do we arrive at that number? The old fashion way-accounting for fixed expenses such as insurance, office staff, phones etc and variables such as labor costs, fuel, travel times etc. After accounting for these numbers a fixed profit margin is applied by formula:

    Price = Cost/1-Desired Profit (a fraction). I use data going back decades to keep pricing in the desired net profit range on blowouts which is 45% +.

    Do low six figures of winter calls and one can understand why to most of us it's the gravy on the meat at the end of the season. Even if you do less it is the easy season's money.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  7. grass disaster

    grass disaster LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,109

    thanks.

    i've been gaining some decent market share in this area. + I get well know in the community.

    I like it cause i get to know the clients while I'm standing oin the garage watching my compressor do all the "work".

    I do plan on raising my prices to gain more profit. My customers love my service. I'm also gaining knowledge, will never get to the 180 unit level, but I'm ok with that.
     
  8. grass disaster

    grass disaster LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,109

    I found one of these for around $2500.

    Anyone use one?

    I believe its 70cfm

    Its Enough for all my residential blowouts.

    Capture+_2019-09-08-17-24-52.png
     
  9. Love the Green Biz

    Love the Green Biz LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,753

    70 CFM will do most residential systems up to 1.5 Inch mainlines. If you can adjust the pressure start out in the 50-60 psi range and see how it goes.
     
  10. grass disaster

    grass disaster LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,109

    Yes
    Biggest line ive ever seen is 3/4

    Thinking I'll go check it out. 2 compressors wont hurt I dont think.
     
    Love the Green Biz and hort101 like this.

Share This Page