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Boxwood problem...any one have any idea of the cause ?

Eakern & Dog

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
greater Atlanta
What I know is..... that they were all green and then turned within the span of a week or so. The turn occured after a commerical application of what I'm guessing was some sort of granular fert/iron mixed with some type of gray looking sand/clay. I noticed the grayish sandy type clay around the crowns of each shrub. These are in Georgia ( Metro Atlanta). It looks more than just a typical winter turn here. Any ideas would be great .Thanks

TNova.jpg
 

SOONER GREEN

LawnSite Member
Location
OKLA CITY,OK
It looks like desiccation from winter. They are probably a variety of box wood that can't tolerate much cold. Normally the ones that are out in the windy areas get it the worst. I've seen it many times that a boxwood in a hedge would die and it would be replaced with one of a different variety that wasn't as winter hardy and would desiccate every year.
 

dKoester

LawnSite Gold Member
Location
Chesapeake VA
Winter bronzing. We grow our own and during the winter this is common for varieties that aren't so cold tolerant. Most do return back to their full color just takes some time.
 

ted putnam

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Arkansas
What I know is..... that they were all green and then turned within the span of a week or so. The turn occured after a commerical application of what I'm guessing was some sort of granular fert/iron mixed with some type of gray looking sand/clay. I noticed the grayish sandy type clay around the crowns of each shrub. These are in Georgia ( Metro Atlanta). It looks more than just a typical winter turn here. Any ideas would be great .Thanks
The gray clay was most likely Merit systemic insecticide. The bigger ones definitely look like some freeze damage. Some of those smaller ones really took a beating.
 

jimshack

LawnSite Member
I have seen alot of plants stressed from the cold this winter, just hoping they survive. I had to lay bermuda in Nov. and I'm pretty sure some of it died, glad I told the customer up front there was a chance of it happening. as far as those box woods, I'd wait until way into April to see if they start recovering or not.
 

Danscapes

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio
Number of different variables. First one is, what type of boxwood are they? Winter Gem, Green Velvet etc...?? Another is, you said the soil was clay, so was the soil amended before planting??? Boxwoods do not like wet feet so if they were just planted in the clay alone than they probably have root rot. That's easy to find if you pull a plant out and it smells like crap than that's what it is. Like I said though, there are too many variables.
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
Danscapes made a good point! Does the area have a slight slope? How is the drainage? Too wet? Yew bushes are also very sensitive to poor drainage. Do I see a yellow yew bush in the picture?
However, I think your original suspicions are correct. Some other company treated the area with fert plus a pre-emergent weed control. They probably applied too heavy. Casoran maybe? Snapshot? Oryzalin? I don't know anything about these products. If it is not yellow, that probably eliminates the dinitroanilines. How about excess Ronstar?
Do boxwoods at other places with the same weather look OK? Another company may have hired a rookie--they have to learn somewhere. LOL! Does the customer have paperwork and records as to what was used?
 
OP
Eakern & Dog

Eakern & Dog

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
greater Atlanta
Hey Folks,

Thanks for the input thus far !

They were planted in amended soil and the roots looked good so does the drainage...I checked. The "gray clay" was something that was added along the crowns of the Boxwoods by a Chem Corp the customer recently hired. I'm assuming it was a granular application of something. I'm waiting to here back as to what was applied ,etc... All of the boxwoods ...which are a lot more than in this picture turned the same way, same time. There are two in the back yard that did not turn but they are a different variety and were not treated . I'll see if I can get a close up if the foliage while waiting for more info. on the soil and what was applied.
 

alf500series

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
branson, mo.
i know people use them alot, but if they do end up dead i would replace them with something different. maybe something that doesn't smell like cat piss when they get older. maybe a japanese holly--looks like the boxwood but without the smell.
 
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