Bucket selection

jbailey52

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Horticulture
I think I already know the answer to this, but do you guys find a toothed bucket on a skidsteer is easy to excavate with then the normal flat edged bucket? Debated if its worth the cost of buying another bucket.
 

crazymike

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Ontario
I think I already know the answer to this, but do you guys find a toothed bucket on a skidsteer is easy to excavate with then the normal flat edged bucket? Debated if its worth the cost of buying another bucket.
Don't buy a second bucket, buy a bolt on tooth bar. It's handy to have for really touch soils, etc... but won't allow you to do a clean finish grade.

Having a dedicated tooth bucket would not only be expensive, but also another bucket to carry around, clutter the work space, etc...

I don't use the tooth bar that often. Maybe others do?
 

DVS Hardscaper

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
County Jail
The difference between a toothed bucket and a smooth is day and night.

We use the toothed bucket for very hard, rocky soil. Or for dry clay soil. With teeth, you can dig to China with no problem, it just rips through the earth. (provided you don't have no sissy a$$ New Holland or Bobcat! LOL! LOL! LOL!)

We have a bucket with a toothbar. If you're working in frozen soil - you'll bend the toothbar up and break the teeth off. Toothbars do not do well with frozen ground.

A bucket with dedicated teeth will be much better than a tooth bar.

You can always have the teeth welded to a smooth bucket. Used buckets are hard to come across, as they usually get sold with the machine. BUt if you can find a used bucket in good shape, thats the way to go. From time to time I try to watch Craigslist for used buckets, usually with no luck.
 

crazymike

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Ontario
The difference between a toothed bucket and a smooth is day and night.

We use the toothed bucket for very hard, rocky soil. Or for dry clay soil. With teeth, you can dig to China with no problem, it just rips through the earth. (provided you don't have no sissy a$$ New Holland or Bobcat! LOL! LOL! LOL!)

We have a bucket with a toothbar. If you're working in frozen soil - you'll bend the toothbar up and break the teeth off. Toothbars do not do well with frozen ground.

A bucket with dedicated teeth will be much better than a tooth bar.

You can always have the teeth welded to a smooth bucket. Used buckets are hard to come across, as they usually get sold with the machine. BUt if you can find a used bucket in good shape, thats the way to go. From time to time I try to watch Craigslist for used buckets, usually with no luck.
I've never bent a tooth bar, but never dug much in frozen ground really.

Do you keep your bucket on the trailer or only bring it when you think you will need it?
 

DVS Hardscaper

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
County Jail
I've never bent a tooth bar, but never dug much in frozen ground really.

Do you keep your bucket on the trailer or only bring it when you think you will need it?
We only bring what we need for the jobs. My saying is "travel light", dont carry anything that you dont need, thats just more crap that needs cleaned up from the side of the road if theres ever an accident.


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Gilmore.Landscaping

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Ontario
I have seen our guys use the toothed bucket maybe once. We have large skid steers so they power through with a smooth bucket just fine. If the soil is frozen then we are probably plowing anyway so that's not a good reason. If you only use smaller machines then the teeth will help rip up the harder soils.

I would say not worth the purchase price, if its really needed you can probably just rent it for pennies.
 

crazymike

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Ontario
I have seen our guys use the toothed bucket maybe once. We have large skid steers so they power through with a smooth bucket just fine. If the soil is frozen then we are probably plowing anyway so that's not a good reason. If you only use smaller machines then the teeth will help rip up the harder soils.

I would say not worth the purchase price, if its really needed you can probably just rent it for pennies.
Yeah, I assume it's because the ground freezes so fast and deep here in Canada, we don't use them.

Even when I had wheel loaders, I didn't have teeth on the bucket. And we used them for loading fill/top soil all summer.

I've heard of people sharpening the edge of their skidsteer bucket with a grinder, I've never tried it.
 

DVS Hardscaper

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
County Jail
its hard to sit at a computer and tell someone from afar what bucket to use.

Soil conditions are the ultimate decider. Making the size of the skid steer irrelivant.

If you ever sat a bucket with dedicated teeth next to a bucket with a tootbar - you're going to see drastic differences in the size and the strength of the teeth.

A skid steer will dig without teeth. But the teeth give the machine an aggressive stance and make the machine work less harder and save wear and tear on the lift arms, cylinders, etc. Not to mention teeth will save on labor time.

We work year 'round. But our toothbar first got mangled in the spring. The ground was thawed and the sun was out. But.....around the corner of the house it was shaded! So the soil there was frozen solid like an ice cube!

This is an industry where you almost need one of each of everything. From a wheeled skid steer and a CTL, to a smooth bucket, along with a tooth bucket. A Compact utility tractor. A dump trailer. A mini excavator, along with a mid size excavator. A small tamper for compacting the pavers, and a large tamper for compacting the base! A computer for office work, and a smart phone for monitoring lawnsite!


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muddywater

LawnSite Bronze Member
I think you can skip a tooth bucket on a 10,000lb track machine. They usually have enough ass that it doesnt matter. Anything smaller or on wheels will see a big difference with teeth. And if its a jcb... Definately need teeth! Jk jk!
 

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