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Recently cut back buckthorn in the middle of a clients berm. I know it will come back so I was going to paint a solution of 20% Glyphosate on the stumps. My concern is for the other plants that surround the buckthorn. If I am very careful with application could it still weep into the surrounding plants through the root system?
 

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Buckthorn--it is a big invasive problem tree around here. Botanic garden has a lot.
I think there is no problem with the painted-on Roundup. Not likely to leach out in my opinion.
Maybe you could paint it with Trimec.
I am not sure either one would have any effect.
Does anyone know of any proof--one way or the other?

Ms Google found this...

and

 

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Recently cut back buckthorn in the middle of a clients berm. I know it will come back so I was going to paint a solution of 20% Glyphosate on the stumps. My concern is for the other plants that surround the buckthorn. If I am very careful with application could it still weep into the surrounding plants through the root system?
We use Tordon for cut stumps...doesn't kill the grass around the trees we use it on
 

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Yes, an herbicide can affect other plants sharing same root zone as target plant.

You can put glyphosate, triclopyr, or tordon on cut stumps. All 3 work. Whatever you pick, just apply the product immediately after cutting before the stump seals. Fall is the best time for cut stump treatment since plants are absorbing and pulling nutrients down into root system for winter storage. Best time for complete kill.

Most powerful stump killer of the 3? Most likely TORDON.
What would I use: triclopyr

WARNING:
I can attest to tordon potentially damaging other plants sharing the same root system. Customer yard was a complete out of control disaster. One problem was customer had planted wisteria vines along a chain link fence and they were out of control. Sprinkler heads were buried under wisteria. I severed the vines at ground level and treated stumps with tordon. Myself, customer, and neighbor were aware of what I was doing AND I warned them tordon could affect other plants in same root zone. All 3 agreed if customer's arborvitae were affected, we'd all 3 pitch in to replace any affected arborvitae, that's what a mess this customer yard was. 2 of neighbor arborvitae were significantly affected and we replaced them next spring. I applied tordon about 4 feet from most affected arborvitae. I was fairly liberal with the tordon, so that may have played into the undesired damage.

TORDON DAMAGED ARBORVITAE:
Plant Leaf Larch Tree Hedge
 

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I can't speak for glyphosate or triclopyr damage from cut stump treatment. I suspect both products will put some type of disclaimer on their product like tordon does. Yes, arborvitae are rather sensitive. The neighbor always gets winter burn on this row of arborvitae but it goes away by late spring.

NO, that photo I attached ain't winter burn. It was absolutely from the tordon cut stump treatment on the wisteria vines. showed up about 6 weeks after application in late summer. Application was about Sept 1. Damage showed up in October.
 

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I was worried about that too after painting a stump, so what I did was cut any main roots around the base of the buckthorn in case the root system was connected to a nearby tree.
 

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Recently cut back buckthorn in the middle of a clients berm. I know it will come back so I was going to paint a solution of 20% Glyphosate on the stumps. My concern is for the other plants that surround the buckthorn. If I am very careful with application could it still weep into the surrounding plants through the root system?
ALSO: you need to treat cut stumps within 30 minutes of cutting in order for herbicide to be truly effective. Those cut stumps start sealing FAST.

Look up 'cut stump' OR 'hack and squirt' on YouTube. You'll find lots of videos of folks doing this. Look for videos from university or forestry workers, not just some Joe Blow squirting product.
 

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We've used glyphosate on cut stumps for over two decades and never...never had issues. We typically brushcut and treat the cuts immediately so we miss as few as possible. We use the glyphosate full strength with the cheapie 2" paintbrushes sold at the big box stores. If working solo, we do about a 50-75 foot square area and then hit the cuts before moving on. If there's a helper, they can follow and do the painting...that's really productive. Glyphosate on cut stumps is listed right on the label...not sure why anyone would suggest it doesn't work that way. I agree that treating the cuts immediately is key and covering all the cambium of the cut is the best practice.
 

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In my experience, Glyphosate is the least likely to transfer via root grafting to nearby desirable plants. Followed by 24D, Triclopyr, Fluroxypyr. What has a high risk of root graft transfer includes Imazapyr, Picloram(Tordon) and Aminocyclopyrachlor(Method).
 

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Gly is intended for absorption through photosynthesis in the leaves. Its not the correct product for stump applications.
Not at all! Though there are many other herbicides that do this.

Glyphosate's mode of action is to inhibit the formation of critical amino acids, particularly at points of growth. It does so by being transported to these points via the plant's vascular system. Application to leaves works, because of the high surface area (which allows for high total amounts of absorption), and the circulatory system that carries sugars produced in the leaves down to the roots will bring the gly along for the ride. But application of concentrate directly to the cambium of a plant will be even more effective than foliar application.
 
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