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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have a new bug, or bee or whatever this is...invade our yard recently.

Could not see a stinger, and out of all of our flowers, it only lands on the plumbago. It seems to be gathering nectar or pollen from the flower.

Can anyone tell me what it is? I've never seen one in our area before...

Thanks.

Flower Plant Blue Petal Terrestrial plant
 

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If that picture is of it is hovering in flight,This may sound stupid but it just might be a humming bird.We have some that are about the size of a BIG carpenter bee.I've only ever seen one in the northern part of Pa.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
At first, I thought it was a small hummingbird when it flew by. But upon closer inspection, it does have antennae, and it's fuzzy, like a bee.

I couldn't get a real clear picture, because it wouldn't land or sit still long enough to focus on it.

I figured it was a common bee, and everyone would think I was crazy asking what it was, but we just don't have these bugs here in the area.
 

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Ditto MowinChic & KenH. Saw that thing once this year & had the same reaction. I have no idea either. It was hanging out on the butterfly bush with the rest of the gang of various bugs.
 

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It is a Hummingbird moth according to what I found on the Internet. Depending on the part of the country they can have different colors. They are even in the desert but have different colors than the one shown on this thread.


"Surprising Hummingbird Mimic


Hummingbirds do not have striped backs. They do not usually appear to be brown. They will not let you approach them to get a closer look. If you believe you saw a brown, striped hummingbird, you probably saw the perfect hummingbird look-a-like. Hummingbird moths have disappointed many people who believed that they were seeing their first hummingbird."
 

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AAHHHHHHH----run-away, run-away!!! It is MOTHRA, king of all moths!!!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Now that I know what area to look in, I've found a few more facts about these moths.

A Hummingbird Clearwing (Hummingbird Moth) is green, and really, really resembles a hummingbird when it flies by. They are found mostly in the North and East, and seen pretty often.

A Snowberry Clearwing (as pictured above) is smaller than the Hummingbird Clearwing, yellow and black, and resembles a bumble bee. These are seen from coast to coast, but alot more rare to find.

They are both sphinx moths, but different in color and size. At least that's the only differences I could find.

Here are a few pictures of the Hummingbird Clearwing.

Thanks again for all your help and information.

Flower Pollinator Plant Arthropod Insect
 
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