Can A New LCO Land Commercial Accounts?

Kell

LawnSite Member
Location
Atlanta
While I'm new to lawncare, I've been in the landscaping business for 30 years. I'd say 80 percent of the commercial work I've done comes from referrals or because I was already working in the area. Thats going to really limit you from the start. You should already have a website going and stating your launch in the spring. Image and branding and SEO will need to also be mastered before startup. I think this is most important-You need to be able to sell. Outside sales can be brutal. You must have some charisma and a good personallity to have success.

Do you plan on working for Property Management Organizations? I'd be targeting the local ones and avoiding ones on the other side of the country.

With all this being said I'd probably budget around 80k to 100k dollars for your startup. I'd like to see your business model sometime(send me a PM and I'll give you my email) and I wish you good luck.
 

Kell

LawnSite Member
Location
Atlanta
Hey
While I'm new to lawncare, I've been in the landscaping business for 30 years. I'd say 80 percent of the commercial work I've done comes from referrals or because I was already working in the area. Thats going to really limit you from the start. You should already have a website going and stating your launch in the spring. Image and branding and SEO will need to also be mastered before startup. I think this is most important-You need to be able to sell. Outside sales can be brutal. You must have some charisma and a good personallity to have success.

Do you plan on working for Property Management Organizations? I'd be targeting the local ones and avoiding ones on the other side of the country.

With all this being said I'd probably budget around 80k to 100k dollars for your startup. I'd like to see your business model sometime(send me a PM and I'll give you my email) and I wish you good luck.


Hey I’m been doing lawn care for 4 years and I wanted to start getting commercial accounts. How do I start going about that
 

Mac-s Lawn & Snow

LawnSite Bronze Member
Hey



Hey I’m been doing lawn care for 4 years and I wanted to start getting commercial accounts. How do I start going about that
Read my post and every other post, there's some good info there. I am only doing residential work with my new company for all the reasons everyone else already stated in their post, Commercial work sometimes is not about what you know, but who you know.
 

landscaper22

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
South Carolina
What you need is to network with friends that work in these commercial places. Not all will be looking for lowest bidders, but many will. It's alot about who you know though. Try to get some industrial accounts. To me they are the best. Usually no one bothers you and as long as you show up and do good work, they won't come out and say you need to do this or you are not doing that. They are too busy running an operation and they just don't want to have CEOs show up with the grounds looking unkept. And with them, you can get a lot of extras usually. Never know when they will want some landscaping done. You can get some big side projects. The main thing is carry proper liability insurance and proper commercial truck insurance. That is a big thing for commercial accounts. But comercial accounts can be in all shapes and sizes. Look into doing some insurance offices, doctor's offices, etc...There is no reason a new company can't get some of these job. A lot of times though they tend to feel better dealing with people they know and that have been around awhile. But industrial accounts are my favorite by far.
 

lawnmanppark

LawnSite Member
yes absoulutly a new company can get commercial accounts it is more difficult not having references but if you come off professional and knowledgable thatll help and come up with a reason why even a new company what you can offer others cant just make sure you know how to do the job if you get it commercial properties are a different service and youll need different equipment than for residentials and the main thing is commercial properties have a lot of bushes so youll need a way to haul away all the debris and no loyalty so sales will have to be ongoing
 

lawnmanppark

LawnSite Member
and to go from the one post about image branding and website you see this a lot guys vinyl there trucks thinking commercial accounts will care that's how you get residential look at the big companies company name on door no writing all on the truck saying licensed insured etc a lot of the big companies don't even have phone number on truck
 

Marshall's Yard Service

LawnSite Senior Member
and to go from the one post about image branding and website you see this a lot guys vinyl there trucks thinking commercial accounts will care that's how you get residential look at the big companies company name on door no writing all on the truck saying licensed insured etc a lot of the big companies don't even have phone number on truck
I've barely seen any of the big companies this year like Rupert, US Lawns, etc. I have seen many small one man operations with a door magnet doing the jobs I've seen the big companies doing in the past. I like seeing that!
 

lawnmanppark

LawnSite Member
Hey



Hey I’m been doing lawn care for 4 years and I wanted to start getting commercial accounts. How do I start going about that
outside sales is the way just be knowledgable look clean cut and don't get down when you hear no its a numbers game the more places you go to the more chances you have and be persistant once I want a particular place I go there every couple months build repor with them so when they are ready your first on there mind
 

TPendagast

LawnSite Fanatic
this all depends on how you define "commercial"
if youre running about doing burger kings and gas stations, yea low bid, not too hard.
if youre looking for the more 'exclusive' commercial jobs, these arent typically serviceable by a one man band, they require things in the bid like minimum years in service, minimum insurance requirements, minimum number of professional references and an equipment list of a certain size that isnt "imagination" (ie if i get this job - then I imagine ill buy that equipment)
THOSE types of jobs are the "Valhalla" of commercial contracts people hear hushed whispers about.
they typically dont go to the lowest bidder, they go to the LOWEST, RESPONSIVE. RESPONSIBLE bidder...We've been the third lowest bidder and landed those accounts many times.
It's about being the right fit.

Can a new guy be the right fit?
Yes - just not a solo
Bear in mind some company's ONLY do commercial and only EVER did commercial.
However these companies are typically started by someone who was already employed in the industry, has some contacts and a reputation.

This is one of the key reasons why I keep telling people "go work for someone else for 3-5 years, get established, learn things...either being a key player in a larger company is a good fit for you, youve decided this industry isnt a good fit for you, or larger companies can't offer you enough compensation to stay on; in which case you either got out of/through the worst period in a newbies landscape career without debt and ruining your credit OR you enter your new found entrepreneurship from a competitive and informed angle (greatly reducing your probability of failure)
many think they can rush in and make more money in the first three years than they could working for someone else. This is folly and naivety.
You either have to pay your loans back or pay yourself back.
Start up takes capitol, investment must be returned.
You will never make more money on a new venture in high competition fields than being well compensated in the same field where eager, competent employees are difficult to find and keep.

Get educated and connected while you get paid.
Join up with a local big company and learn the ropes!
If you really want to start, you can do that in 3-5 years and you could go straight into commercial , never servicing a single private home.
 

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