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City code requires certificaiton for excavations

queen of spades

LawnSite Member
Location
Atlanta, GA
From my city's code:

No equipment operator or supervisory personnel shall participate in any excavation or trenching or in any way work in an excavation or trench unless such person holds a valid certificate evidencing satisfactory completion of a required educational program on safe trench/excavation practices. No other person shall participate in or work in any excavation or trenching site unless a certificate holder is present at the excavation or trench site where work is being performed.​

They define excavation as:
any manmade cavity or depression in the earth(s surface, including its sides, walls, or faces, form by earth removal and producing unsupported earth conditions as a result of the excavation. If installed forms or similar structures reduce the depth to width relationship, an excavation may become a trench.​

So according to this, digging a 3' deep french drain requires an OSHA approved excavation certificate.

Does anyone have such a cert? I searched and didn't see much info on the subject, and nothing in my area.
 

AWJ Services

LawnSite Platinum Member
Location
Ga
From my city's code:

No equipment operator or supervisory personnel shall participate in any excavation or trenching or in any way work in an excavation or trench unless such person holds a valid certificate evidencing satisfactory completion of a required educational program on safe trench/excavation practices. No other person shall participate in or work in any excavation or trenching site unless a certificate holder is present at the excavation or trench site where work is being performed.​

They define excavation as:
any manmade cavity or depression in the earth(s surface, including its sides, walls, or faces, form by earth removal and producing unsupported earth conditions as a result of the excavation. If installed forms or similar structures reduce the depth to width relationship, an excavation may become a trench.​

So according to this, digging a 3' deep french drain requires an OSHA approved excavation certificate.

Does anyone have such a cert? I searched and didn't see much info on the subject, and nothing in my area.
What city?

I think that it only pertains to trenches that can be entered by a human. A 12 inch french drain trench would not apply.

You would need to call someone who does utility work as they would need someone on staff for this.
 

curtisfarmer

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Southern, NH
Interesting....and confusing. In NH and MA, no city or other municpal authoirty can supercede state liscensing or certificate requirements. Sounds like they pulled that from the BOCA code book or some other building code organization to prevent hack contractors. Do you need an excavation "certificate" in your state? That rule book seems pretty vague without spelling EXACTLY what regulation they are reffering to.:confused:
 

Blue Goose

LawnSite Senior Member
Would they be referring to OSHA 10 certification? OSHA 10 does cover the operations that were listed if in fact that is what they're requiring. I know more and more job sites and contractors therein are requiring OSHA 10.
 

wellbuilt

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Monroe, NY
I just eyed up a notice about soils certificate needed in NY.
I was thinking it was more for soil erosion then human safety's .
Our dirt is mostly clay and rock so there isnt much chance of cave in here but if I dig in town the town engineers are all over my ass with banking and trenching boxes . I don't work much more the 5 or 6' in the ground .
 

YellowDogSVC

LawnSite Gold Member
Location
TX
I just eyed up a notice about soils certificate needed in NY.
I was thinking it was more for soil erosion then human safety's .
Our dirt is mostly clay and rock so there isnt much chance of cave in here b .
famous last words. I wouldn't trust any soil when it comes to my life.
 

Darryl G

Inactive
Good luck enforcing that one. Guys around here still routinely do excavations without even marking it out/calling dig safe or pulling permits for their landscaping jobs. Yah, I dig on my own property without calling it in, which is technically illegal, but if it's on a customer's property I always do. OSHA doesn't apply to owner/operator activities BTW.
 
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