Colorado State University

Smallaxe

LawnSite Fanatic
Here is an interesting little article dealing with K in winterizer and reason for timing...

http://www.coopext.colostate.edu/4dmg/Lawns/mythwint.htm

Those who advocate using fertilizers with this type of formula say that the need is based on research. But, the research has been done with WARM-SEASON grasses, such as Bermudagrass or Zoysiagrass, neither of which is well-adapted to our climate (and should not be fertilized with nitrogen in fall anyway!) No evidence is available to suggest that extra phosphorus and potassium in fall benefit COOL-SEASON grasses used here, such as bluegrass, fescue or ryegrass.

The most important nutrient for fall fertilization, as with earlier-season applications, still is NITROGEN. Nitrogen applied in the fall is the most important lawn fertilization of the year. Use a high-nitrogen fertilizer, such as 25-5-5 or something with a similar formula.


It is my opinion that alot of our 'conventional wisdom' comes from Warm-Season research...
 

Skipster

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Billings, MT
I don't know that we can put all of "conventional wisdom" onto warm-season grasses, since many LCOs and fertilizer sellers (like big box stores, local lawn & garden stores, and farmers cop-ops) still promote fall as the optimal fertilization time for bermudagrass in the south, although we know this is not the optimal fertilization time. This was the result of taking "conventional wisdom" from cool-season grasses and transporting it southward. The first truf research in the US was done by the USDA looking for better forage species and management in cool-season areas.

But, I don't think your link is news to anyone. No cool-season research has promoted late K applications, no universities promote it, and all the promotion of it that I cna find is specifically for warm-season turf. Is it "conventional wisdom" if it comes with a caveat? I don't think so.

But, instead of waging a war on warm-season vs cool-season, maybe you would benefit from learning about them both and learning their similarities and differences. Some cool season practices have transferred very well to warm-season culture, while others have not.
 
OP
S

Smallaxe

LawnSite Fanatic
I don't know that we can put all of "conventional wisdom" onto warm-season grasses, since many LCOs and fertilizer sellers (like big box stores, local lawn & garden stores, and farmers cop-ops) still promote fall as the optimal fertilization time for bermudagrass in the south, although we know this is not the optimal fertilization time. This was the result of taking "conventional wisdom" from cool-season grasses and transporting it southward. The first truf research in the US was done by the USDA looking for better forage species and management in cool-season areas.

But, I don't think your link is news to anyone. No cool-season research has promoted late K applications, no universities promote it, and all the promotion of it that I cna find is specifically for warm-season turf. Is it "conventional wisdom" if it comes with a caveat? I don't think so.

But, instead of waging a war on warm-season vs cool-season, maybe you would benefit from learning about them both and learning their similarities and differences. Some cool season practices have transferred very well to warm-season culture, while others have not.
Conventional wisdom is in the market place and written on your 'winterizer' bag of fert. Conventional wisdom is on the tongues of Pros and lawncare H.O.s...

I know it is not in the Universties... that's my point... everybody knows something that isn't so...

The funny thing is: Next fall everyone will be talking about getting their K on their lawns in Wisco after the ground is frozen... that's the convention... :laugh:
 

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