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Boy this thread went down the toilet quick. it took me 30 year of sucking knowledge from anyone I could talk to that got me where I am now. I closed the deal on a $20,000 landscape job this morning. It would have been easier to have gotten some formal training in less than 2 years or so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Boy this thread went down the toilet quick. it took me 30 year of sucking knowledge from anyone I could talk to that got me where I am now. I closed the deal on a $20,000 landscape job this morning. It would have been easier to have gotten some formal training in less than 2 years or so.
Nice, it feels good to get those big jobs, sure beats the heck out of mowing lawns every day. We’ve got big jobs lined up as well, and the face to face meets with suppliers and other owners certainly helps, but many of those guys went to
College, however it seems the guys I speak to went to college and then started their businesses, not the other way around.

They’re not on lawnsite either
 

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Not really a drawing type person, but one the local guys here, whom I’d probably say would qualify as a mentor, has a bachelors degree from MSU, he’s been at it for nearly 40 years, brings in about 750 a year and gets his winters off.

it is a basic program though, I see it more so to gain that extra knowledge to help me where I am and to get me over the top per se.
I don’t see it as whipping it out in front of a client and say “oh I have a degree, I know what I’m talking about…”
I would pick this guy’s brain as much as possible. He probably has a wealth of knowledge he’d be willing to pass on.
 

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I get healthcare out of the fire gig, along with an hsa account. and I give back to my community (cliche, I know…) it’s not a paying job in the sense of a regular full time job.
landscaping/ lawn maint is my full time gig. In Michigan, to be at most full time departments
, would require
Medic school, which is at least another 2 years, and once again, running primarily medical calls is pretty boring (I feel like I’m repeating myself)
There are a few (actually Only one that I one
Of) that don’t do medical transport and sub it out. Working at a full time department would also require a 24/48 schedule which kinda puts a killer
On the snow business which is pretty good income
For
Us
Gotcha, so this would be your full time endeavor with future plans to build something stable. If I didn't have a great mentor to work with for a couple years who was going to allow me to see it all, I think I'd probably chose a formal education too. It's not necessary obviously, lots of roads to Rome or roam until you figure it out and those teach lessons too. But myself, I like a little structure to my learning and then apply it.
 

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I say go for it. Yes, you can learn almost everything in those classes from people and online for free. At least you have a direction and will most likely reap the knowledge of your schooling.
How many people do we all know that graduated college and never entered a profession/career that followed their degree?

I never had a customer ask 'where did you learn this from?". Maybe just me. But if you are knowledgeable about the subject and confident with your response, customers don't care where you learned it from.
 

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They’re not on lawnsite either
See in your thread you've talked down about lawnsite and even added it to your signature line

So if everyone else here knows nothing why ask?

Your original post lacked any enthusiasm or direction towards a specialty in the business more like how can I go to college and get more money or you're bored was added later
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
See in your thread you've talked down about lawnsite and even added it to your signature line
not necessarily, I wouldn’t say that or any derivation to anyone, wether it’s lawnsite, Facebook, or my buddy Joe. Instead I’d say “research has shown, or from what I’ve read”
I found it funny, I’m sorry you don’t.
So if everyone else here knows nothing why ask?
I ask questions on Facebook too, I guess you’re going to have learn to separate the good from the bad,

Your original post lacked any enthusiasm or direction towards a specialty in the business more like how can I go to college and get more money or you're bored was added later
[/QUOTE]
This was in my first post.
Not sure why this doesn’t show direction.
many of the initial posts were simple “no” with no explanation as to why.
[/QUOTE]
I’d like to transition the business from a mowing gig to more of an turf/ ornamental care and landscaping
 

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Not once in my career has anyone ever asked where I got my knowledge. Some of you must deal with a lot ruder of clientele than I do.
Some people wing it when a customer asks them something they don't know
 
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I will just say that when I was thinking about starting my venture into fert and squirt the folks on here were an incredible help and source of knowledge. Stuff I would never had been able to get in a classroom.... And still are. I had never ever sprayed a single lawn before and just took the leap of faith, spent countless hours gleaning info on this site, took many courses from our state agriculture department over the period of about 2 years before I actually started the chemical side of my company. The whole time mowing lawns full time. I consider it self study. You can do just about anything you put your mind to.
 

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Things are d
Boy this thread went down the toilet quick. it took me 30 year of sucking knowledge from anyone I could talk to that got me where I am now. I closed the deal on a $20,000 landscape job this morning. It would have been easier to have gotten some formal training in less than 2 years or so.
Its the real world experience that teaches the most though, mistakes have to be made. We definitely had some jobs that just didn't turn out great I will admit and got to doing 6 figure jobs in 5 years with only lawn site as my guide. Before that 5 years I did a nursery job, grew pot illegally in California and worked about 1.5 years various landscaping companies. If you had lawn site 30 years ago would have bene better off. But its not the dollar amount that mattered, all the real world experience of making a lot of mistakes to get the confidence needed. Still made a ton of mistakes on this large one we just did, happy to walk away with 5-10% profit. Materials went up. big time, quoted 8 months ago, did not get to adjust prices. Just ate it

There are people here willing to mentor new guys, Ted responded to me and went back and forth for dozens of messages, several others have been helpful including HOrt101
 

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As someone who is really close to getting my 2 year degree (but might abandon), in my opinion, take the classes that are relevant to your goals and interests, not nothing else. In other words, just take your business and horticulture classes and don't worry about getting a "degree". Certificates are fine.

I had one fluff class this semester, environmental science to take on-line, but it was brutal. I did learn some interesting things about nitrogen pollution, but this class took up so much of my time that I would have rather spent working on the business.

The economics, business management, construction management, business communications classes have been useful. I would like to learn more about estimating, scheduling, and pricing.
 
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