cutting railroad ties??

Harry0

LawnSite Member
Location
NJ
Tried a large circular(I think it was 12 inch). Was a pain to keep from binding. I also tried a 8 inch and cut it twice, took a long time. I now use a chainsaw and square 3 sides to assure a straight cut-Harry
 

olderthandirt

LawnSite Platinum Member
Location
here
The best thing I found is, don't laugh is an electric chainsaw. I don't know why they seem to work better than a gas but they do for me.

Mac
 
If you use a chainsaw be ready to go through alot of chains. the creosote(sp?) will really eat them up. Unless you have newer ones which perhaps doesnt have it.
 

GreenMonster

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
NH
Same as everyone else...

chainsaw.
 

PaulJ

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Columbus, NE
You can try a big circular saw wiht carbide tipped blades. I've tried this and it worked pretty well. A chinsaw is still faster but doesn't give as nice a cut.
 

Harry0

LawnSite Member
Location
NJ
I assumed you were talking about treated 6x6es, we call those ties. The creosote ties are no longer available here, and if I remember right they had a steel S on the ends that prevented you from cutting them. I didn't know you could still get Creosote ties-Harry
 

Grassmechanic

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
S.E. Michigan
chainsaw with a carbide chain. it will cut nails with no problem.
 

GreenMonster

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
NH
Originally posted by PaulJ
You can try a big circular saw wiht carbide tipped blades. I've tried this and it worked pretty well. A chinsaw is still faster but doesn't give as nice a cut.

This is not a slam, but railroad ties pretty much look like junk anyhow. So a nice cut is pretty much lipstick on a pig:p. I always steer people away from railroad ties, and even pt 6x6's.

There are a lot of segmental retaining walls that are almost as cheap to construct, and IMO, hold up a lot better. Timber walls always seem to creep in eventually, no matter how well built.
 

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