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Damaged tree bark

Discussion in 'Nurseries and Growers' started by Evergreennj, May 8, 2020.

  1. Evergreennj

    Evergreennj LawnSite Member
    Messages: 94

    During transport I damaged the bark of a yoshino cherry. Nothing deep but the bark has peeled off in a few places. What’s my best course of action to ensure it’s recovery after planting?
     
  2. starry night

    starry night LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,328

    just leave it alone. If it is going to heal, it will do it on its own.
     
    Cam15 and Evergreennj like this.
  3. hal

    hal LawnSite Fanatic
    from Georgia
    Messages: 5,814

    Duct tape!!!! (Just kidding, do what starry night said)
     
    Cam15 likes this.
  4. OP
    OP
    Evergreennj

    Evergreennj LawnSite Member
    Messages: 94

    Thanks. I’ve read it’s best to let it heal on its own.

    My concern is that’s it’s for a customer. It’s completely around the trunk. I’m worried it won’t heal, and potentially might lose the tree. I’m ready to eat the cost and buy a new one. Plant this one in my yard and tend to it.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Evergreennj

    Evergreennj LawnSite Member
    Messages: 94

    I’m no arborist but from what I can tell it’s only the thinnest layer of bark. Doesn’t seem to go deeper than that. But it is a good amount of bark in a 5”-6” section
     
  6. starry night

    starry night LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,328

    The important part of bark that transports water and nutrients is paper-thin. If the damage is completely around the trunk, then you better replace it.
     
    Cam15 and hal like this.
  7. OP
    OP
    Evergreennj

    Evergreennj LawnSite Member
    Messages: 94

    The cambium correct? Didn’t know it was that thin. I did read about girdling. From what I’ve read if it’s more than 50% the likelihood it survives drastically. I’ll take your advice and replace it. Maybe with luck it will survive at my house.
    Thanks starry, appreciate the feedback.
     
  8. Mowing monkey.

    Mowing monkey. LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,135

    I’ve seen people duct tape the damaged bark back on. I don’t know if that helps or not. Damage all the way around on a planted tree to boot probably won’t survive.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Evergreennj

    Evergreennj LawnSite Member
    Messages: 94

    Not sure. The bark is actually still attached to the tree but has just peeled back in a few areas. I’ve read a bit on grafting but all the sources say to clean cut the damaged bark back to healthy bark and work from there.
    I don’t have enough knowledge on the subject to make a judgement call. I’m going to plant it in my yard, spray with an insecticide and let nature do its work. Best outcome I have a beautiful cherry tree in my front yard. Worst outcome, I managed to kill a healthy young tree. Lesson learned.
     

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