Dual Pressure Gauge/Flowmeter

Discussion in 'Professional Discussions' started by Hayduke, Oct 7, 2019.

  1. Hayduke

    Hayduke LawnSite Member
    from Oregon
    Messages: 204

    upload_2019-10-7_9-6-56.jpeg

    I bought one of these a few years back, I think Toro made it. I sent it back because it was crap and made my own. Basically just a 1" meter connected to a pressure gauge on a tee and a gate valve to control flow. It's helped me on a few odd systems where I have no idea what the service line size or source is. Just open the gate valve until I've got the flow and pressure synched and I know my what I'm working with.
    Out of curiosity, I'm wondering what sequence of the parts would give the most accurate data. The one I made goes pressure gauge/ball valve/meter. Does it even matter or am I splitting hairs? Mostly just technical curiosity...
    upload_2019-10-7_9-6-56.jpeg
     
  2. Ron Wolfarth

    Ron Wolfarth Sponsor
    Messages: 1,529

    Just off the top of my head, I would think you want to the gate valve down stream of the pressure guage so you can measure static and dynamic.

    The flow meter may not matter where it is. You can throttle down the flow with the gate valve to what you think you need in flow and then read the pressure that you have there.

    I don't know about the most accurate location for the flow meter, but I would think less turbulence would result in more accurate readings, so maybe the flow meter on the inlet side of the valve and pressure gauge? I am not sure the loss of accuracy is enough to worry about. We may be slicing the baloney a little too thin here.
     
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  3. greenmonster304

    greenmonster304 LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,222

    I don’t bother with the flow meter I just use a gauge with a valve and do a bucket test.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Hayduke

    Hayduke LawnSite Member
    from Oregon
    Messages: 204

    I agree with that.

    This makes sense, definitely agree with that

    Wholeheartedly agree..
    Well have you tried bucket testing a 1.5 inch line coming in at 105 psi?
    You gotta be counting real quick to measure 50 gpm or more in a 5 gallon bucket. The meter helps for those situations...
     
  5. greenmonster304

    greenmonster304 LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,222

    [QUOTE="Hayduke, post: 6105520, member
    Well have you tried bucket testing a 1.5 inch line coming in at 105 psi?
    You gotta be counting real quick to measure 50 gpm or more in a 5 gallon bucket. The meter helps for those situations...[/QUOTE]

    Actually.... I did last week, I used a garbage can. I used to have a nice flow meter that I would use but I left it in the truck over the winter a while back and it still had water in it and cracked.
     
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  6. 1idejim

    1idejim LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,702

    Since your thread is based on curiosity, I’m curious how often you measure 1.5 lines at 105psi?
     
  7. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 52,647

    I've done the garbage-can bucket test from some wells that had capacity beyond the simple Toro rig, which is good enough for smaller supplies, and even very good, given the time is taken to calibrate the flow meter against an actual water meter.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Hayduke

    Hayduke LawnSite Member
    from Oregon
    Messages: 204

    Got it, that would work.

    Only partially out of curiosity. I need to test a well system next week and it got me thinking about my methodology. Only pipe to test is a 3/4" stub coming out of the ground that is 300' from the well head. I have no idea if its coming off a 1", 3/4" 1/2" pvc service line, or maybe even electrical conduit with radiator hose-seen that once.

    I don't often measure systems with 1.5" lines at 105 psi because I am confident that they are way over capacity for any system I am putting in. But there are many residences with this type of supply. Municipal water runs 80-120 psi here. In addition many houses have supplemental irrigation water from canals way up in the hills that drops 300' in a 3" pipe before it gets to the houses. The folks on the end of the line have scary pressure and enormous amounts of water available..
     
  9. ArTurf

    ArTurf LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from Ark
    Messages: 6,396

    Last edited: Oct 8, 2019
  10. OP
    OP
    Hayduke

    Hayduke LawnSite Member
    from Oregon
    Messages: 204

    Yep I've got the Hunter comparable model on my set-up (sorry Ron). It's a 1" pulse meter designed to be hooked up to a clock but works fine as just a meter. Only cost me like $93.
     

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