Dumb FEDERAL SAFETY requirements.

Why does this industry put up with the dumb federal safety equipment requirements for our power equipment?

I understand and do like either blade brake or engine kill for our mowers, but a dead man switch on my pole hedge trimmer. After 2 times cutting out because I let go of the switch,(echo model,don't know about other brands) I taped it up. Seems to make it more dangerous to re-start the machine while on the ladder than being on solid ground and climbing the ladder. Another pet peeve is the guards they place on my trimmers. What good is this device if I can’t see what I’m doing?

What do you other people think??
John
 

Eric ELM

Husband, Father, Friend, Angel
Location
Chicago, IL USA
I think it protects the equipment MFG from lawsuits mainly.
 
Eric,
I know some of the safety shields ect.. are just put there so the mfg., like you said won't end up in a lawsuit.

My peve is the federal requirements, such as the dead man switch on the pole hedge trimmer. The Federal gov. dictates to the mfg, min size for saftey shields. Oh well, until our industry rises as a whole, these requirements will continue.
John
 

TLS

LawnSite Fanatic
Safety devices are there for a reason! Some are better than others. On my Dixie, if you get off the seat, the whole mower shuts down. Get up to scratch your but and the screaming engine and blades are forced to stop. It would be like screaming down the highway at 75 mph and just shutting the key off! All manufactures need to rethink their standings on these issues. They are there to protect the dumbest possible operator from killing himself. Although how many of your customers come out to talk to you while you are mowing, and walk right up to the mower and come withen inches of sticking their toes under you mower deck! Happens alot to me. Even when you shut the PTO off, my blades spin for almost 1 minute! I would like to see a lanyard hooked to a kill switch. Just hook it to your belt loop, and if you separate from your mower...it shuts off. These units are as safe as we want them to be. Just be careful.

 

Eric ELM

Husband, Father, Friend, Angel
Location
Chicago, IL USA
I know what your talking about. I've had that happen too and had to pull back on the levers to get away from them. Now when I see someone coming, I shut off the blades and hop off the mower before they get there to prevent this.
 

bob

LawnSite Platinum Member
Location
DE
I remember a story that I heard about 20 years ago. Two guys were drunk and decided to trim the hedges with a 21" mower. They started it and each one grabbed the sides of the deck to pick it up. Fingers went everywhere. Safety interlocks help prevent storys like this.
 

eslawns

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Portsmouth, VA
"I remember a story that I heard about 20 years ago. Two guys were drunk and decided to trim the hedges with a 21" mower. They started it and each one grabbed the sides of the deck to pick it up. Fingers went everywhere. Safety interlocks help prevent storys like this."


I think Darwin was right.

Bobby
 

accuratelawn

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
SW Missouri
The bad thing about the story of the guy using the 21 inch mower to trim hedges was that he won a lawnsuit against the manufacturer of the mower. Product liability case.
People like that have forced the industry into all the saftey switches etc.
 
Thomas, and Eric,
What you both cited are perfect examples of common sense requirements in regard to riding mowers. If you’re not on your riding mower, the mower doesn’t have any business being on. Like I said in my first post, there are some good common sense requirements such as the dead mans bar or B.B.S. on mowers so what happened in Bob’s story doesn’t happen. Unfortunately, it still does happen. I know of some people that wrap a wire or cord around the dead man’s bar because they are too lazy to restart their machines.

But look on a previous thread about the weed whacker\trimmers. (Trimmer Guard off or on???) Look at how many take off a federally required safety feature. Just about everybody does for one reason or another.

Don’t get me wrong, I am a very big fan of safety, but not when my own safety is jeopardized because I can’t see what I’m doing or shaking on a ladder trying to start a machine.
John
 

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