End of Lawn Season Equipment Maintenance

Derwood

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
SE Wisconsin
I got nothing for you on the concrete thing other than I remember years ago in a discussion, it was debunked, and I bought it, and live by it now lololol. Not good enough? I understand. Not trying to sell it lol. And I Can't back it up at all lol!! Not even a little! Other than for the fact that I have batteries in my garage, on the floor, and they're fine.
 

Freaky Fido

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Northeast USA
In all honesty, my equipment gets parked when winter arrives and I'm forced to switch to snow removal. I'll top off the tanks on the mowers and add Star-Tron and that's about it. My seldom-used handhelds only get canned fuel these days and most of my blowers will get used a bit in the winter so I don't do anything to them.
 

Johnny Outside

LawnSite Member
Location
Minnesota
In all honesty, my equipment gets parked when winter arrives and I'm forced to switch to snow removal. I'll top off the tanks on the mowers and add Star-Tron and that's about it. My seldom-used handhelds only get canned fuel these days and most of my blowers will get used a bit in the winter so I don't do anything to them.
Yeah, my 800's get used all winter. I just switched them over to "winter mode"
 

DA Quality Lawn & YS

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Rochester, MN

FitzRightYardServices

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Nebraska
Another item I started doing a few years ago is I pop the drive/deck belts off the tensioners after parking them. Not sure it's necessary but its a couple minute job. I figure it's less unecessary strain on things and the belt won't develop any "memory".
I will have to remember to try this.
 

Derwood

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
SE Wisconsin
Crazy - I did a little digging.

Sounds like people have problems with their batteries in the winter, because they already had an unhealthy battery. Because it's unhealthy, extended "sitting" can cause it to freeze - thus making it seem like winter was the cause for the battery going bad. When really, it was already going bad, and winter just expedited its death. A fully charged, healthy battery, is best stored in the cold - even below freezing temps (because a healthy battery will not freeze) and the colder the temps, the smaller the self discharge rate.

As far as concrete and batteries go, according to this link, that was a thing of the past.


Also, unless things have recently changed, I don't think interstate makes any batteries. Johnson Controls makes them and sells them to Interstate (Walmart too - probably why I like my Walmart batteries so much lol). There's something like only 4 or 5 battery manufacturers out there, if I'm not mistaken. Interstate is not one of them.
 
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Randall Riley

LawnSite Member
Location
Alabama
J
Crazy - I did a little digging.

Sounds like people have problems with their batteries in the winter, because they already had an unhealthy battery. Because it's unhealthy, extended "sitting" can cause it to freeze - thus making it seem like winter was the cause for the battery going bad. When really, it was already going bad, and winter just expedited its death. A fully charged, healthy battery, is best stored in the cold - even below freezing temps (because a healthy battery will not freeze) and the colder the temps, the smaller the self discharge rate.

As far as concrete and batteries go, according to this link, that was a thing of the past.


Also, unless things have recently changed, I don't think interstate makes any batteries. Johnson Controls makes them and sells them to Interstate (Walmart too - probably why I like my Walmart batteries so much lol). There's something like only 4 or 5 battery manufacturers out there, if I'm not mistaken. Interstate is not one of them.
Heat is an enemy to a battery. That's why many newer cars and trucks are coming with blower fans to keep the batteries cool. More cold cranking amps are needed in cold months. A depleted battery will turn an engine easier in warm months but needs more juice in the Winter.
 

rippinryno

LawnSite Gold Member
Batteries don't like heat or cold. So you could have issues with either extreme.

I don't do anything with my batteries except hit them once or twice over the winter with a trickle. My boat battery stays in the boat, disconnected. My camper battery stays in the camper disconnected, it's a deep cycle.

I personally don't change the oil in the fall either, that's a spring item for me.
 

all ferris

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
belleville IL
My routine for the past 20 years...1:park all equipment in the back of the shop and leave it there until about 2 weeks before mowing starts back up. 2: Then air up tires, charge/jump start, sharpen blades, grease, oil change (only if needed). 3: start mowing and fertilizing. I don't even fuel stabilize. I just try to park them with just a bit a fuel in the tanks.

Has worked for me for years and I have lots of equipment that is old (mowers with 4000 hrs+)
 

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