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Ferilizer blends to use for Bermuda / Centipede in GA

jessecarter1312

LawnSite Member
Location
Augusta
Hello everyone!

Been in the lawn care business off and on for about 5 years and now I've landed in the position where I'm calling the shots for what products we use. It's been about 4 years since I last used fertilizer blends and I can't remember what we used in the past for centipede and st augustine lawns. I know we used to used a 35-0-10 for bermuda/zoysia yards.

I also understand that technically every yard is different based on a soil sample, but its not productive to have 20 different fertilizer blends on hand. Was curious what anyone in the GA region was using for their respective grass types.

Thanks!
 

hort101

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
S.E. New England
Welcome to lawnsite Jesse :waving:

I would do some research on centipede its got different needs then most other grasses
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
You might want to get a pH meter. Centipede needs acid soil. And no phosphorus. Other lawns often need lime. Here is a good one. And if cheap fits your needs--the cheapies are about $14.95 at Home Depot.

Of course, it is difficult to carry more than one formula. Still more trouble to carry lime. On the other hand--if you want to be the best. And offer the best quality--you will not have much competition.
I am not sure how many companies carry more than one product--and how they make this possible.
How do you guys cope with so many different types of grass?
 
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takervader

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Alabama
Bermuda/zoysia in general the same, both want you to feed them all the time. They'll eat it. 16-4-8 monthly at low rate, 27-0-11 every 6-8 weeks at higher rate, 1-2lb N depending on irrigation, cutting heights, what it needed from soil test, cultivar, etc etc. 35-0-10 is fine. Balanced (1-1-1) or higher P fert for me only in spring, but do base on soil test.

Centipede, soil test first, 15-0-15 slow release twice a year, thats it. Once at greenup, once around July 4th. About 0.75-1lb N/1000 rate. If the soil is right, it may not even need that much. Much more critical to make centipede happy about its soil, and mostly pH, than anything else. No P unless soil test demands it.

Ag somewhat similar, doesnt like much N at once, 0.5-1lb/1000 every 6 weeks, but maybe a few more apps in a season, just keep an eye on fungus and insects. Also common to see 15-0-15 on it. Rare to put down much P.

So something with high N & some K and then something with more moderate levels of each should get through "most" areas.
 
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RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
15-0-15 is good--so do you mean--centipede gets this formula only twice per year and other grasses get the same formula 5 times per year?
Trying to understand, up here in snow country--it seems like there is no slow-release potassium. After a few good rains the potassium would be gone--leached out. Wouldn't it be better on centipede, to apply a small amount of potash at your regular treatment dates five times per year?
For instance, 5-0-5 mixed with your liquid weed control. And then apply granular 27-0-11 to your Bermuda and zoysia accounts.
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
I am trying to understand, Centipede.

Sounds like you could devise a liquid program that would not interfere with your granular program for St Auggie, zoysia and Bermuda.

A centipede program could use inexpensive urea nitrogen, but dissolved in water at a very low rate.
For instance if you were applying a gallon per thousand sqft--and you dissolved a tenth of a pound of urea in each gallon of water--you would be applying .046 pounds of nitrogen per 1000 sqft. That is 10 pounds per 100 gallons.
Of course, you need, potash--but maybe you want potassium sulfate--thereby avoiding the high chlorine content of muriate of potash.
And you probably want to add iron maybe in a chelated form, if the cost is not too high.
Include a good weed herbicide, of course.
It is your special centipede formula--not available at your competition.
 

grassmasterswilson

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
nc
Centipede will respond well to ammonium sulphate/sulfate of potash blends.

Centipede will want 1-1.5 lbs N annually while Bermuda will want much more.

Look into a climate appraisal to gauge your nutrient removal based on temps ans rain.
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
In theory, during weed season, you could use the centipede solution on every lawn--however then--apply a second step on Bermuda and At Auggie lawns to supply the needed additional nitrogen.
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
Whoops. I was not clear.
By apply a second step--I mean to say--for Bermuda, zoysia and St Augustine use a spreader to add a high-nitrogen granular application, (with slow-release nitrogen) on top of your centipede liquid mix (low rate N with normal herbicide) solution.
I am not sure if this idea is possible during crabgrass season.
How do you to this in the south? Space is tight when you need to carry a tank of liquid plus bagged fertilizer and a spreader in your pickup at the same time. Maybe you can use the Earthway 50 pound professional spreader--probably fit in a small space on your pickup.
 
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