Fertilizing for customers

Matt's Mowing Service

LawnSite Member
Location
Eden, NC
When I give an estimate on a fertilizer job how do I figure how much the yard needs? I know I can measure but is that how most do it or do they just look at it and say, you will need about 100 lbs? Should I go by the back of the bag? How do you give these estimates?
 

CHARLES CUE

LawnSite Gold Member
Location
BURTON WV
Well we don't guess We measure the property L by W than measure all areas that don't get treated and subtract them from the total area.

How much does the yard need ? If your measurment came up to 10 th sq ft and your going to apply 4 lbs per th than your going to need 40 lbs of fert.

Charles Cue
 
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RGM

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Baltimore Md
You should do more research on what your doing to much and you can burn up lawns and some states you need a license for fertilizer most possibly all for weed control and if you don't have one the fines can be harsh.
 

Turf Dawg

LawnSite Gold Member
When I give an estimate on a fertilizer job how do I figure how much the yard needs? I know I can measure but is that how most do it or do they just look at it and say, you will need about 100 lbs? Should I go by the back of the bag? How do you give these estimates?
I am not picking on you, at least you asked to learn, but this is why I really wish fertilizer, herbicides, insecticides, fungicides and anything else I forgot was not sold to the public.
Even without a soil test to see what exactly is needed, you have to know the sq footage. Then after you know the sq footage you have to be able to know how much nitrogen, and other things, or in the bag. It then depends on how much nitrogen you want to apply to know how much that bag is going to cover. Then you need to know how to calibrate the spreader so you are putting that much out.
I wish instead of pulling stuff off the market and putting bands on certain things they would stop public sale and make it where you have to license or a certificate for home owners to buy anything.
 

appalachianoutdoors

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Virginia
Matt's, we all started from not knowing anything about lawn care and have gotten to what we each know by asking questions and becoming educated about what we do, so good job on asking for help. I use the city or county websites for the homeowners property to give me a square footage for the property or I get out my measuring wheel and walk it off. I always do soil samples for my customers so I know and they know what the soil needs. Most nitrogen applications need to be divided into several applications during the year with about 50% of your yearly amount being applied as a slow release form in the fall with your overseeding so you optimize your root growth during the winter months. Heavy spring applications of nitrogen tend to give your excessive leaf growth and thatch buildup at the expense of the grass. Remember also that the soil sample will help you with knowing the soil pH and how much lime is needed. A pH that is too low will basicly cause the fertilizer to not to as effective. I like to keep my yards between a 6.4 and about 6.8pH because I mainly have cool season grasses in my area. Good luck with your business. Keep notes of what you learn about chemical care of your yards and make reference to it when needed.
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Smallaxe

LawnSite Fanatic
Timing is very important and correct cultural practices are more important than application. Most LCOs simply copy the 4-6 step program being done by others in their area...
A true proffessional would know the soil types, SOM, CEC, etc. and would be able to advise the client on the best possible care for his particular lawn...

It is easier to think outside the status quo once you realize that most 'programs' are designed to make money rather than produce healthy turf... Not trying to start another fight, just giving something to think about.... :)
 

Smallaxe

LawnSite Fanatic
Smallaxe, Feel free to go more in depth to help Matt's or others on the site to learn more.
There are many serious considerations when considering cultural practices, so I hope you're not being fecesious... :)
 

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