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ford problems

finnegan

LawnSite Member
Location
hamburg,ny
those of you that own fords, check the hot lead that goes to the starter solenoid before you take your truck out next time, we've had two 99 f250 crap out within 13 days of each other,it seems ford knew that corrosion would be a problem here and put little plastic caps on the leads instead of beefing up the terminal ends they fall off and leave you stranded, check-em and change-em
 

timberjack

LawnSite Member
I've had similar problems with almost any electrical terminal I could think of. I found that coating them liberally with dielectric grease in the fall virtually eliminates corrosion. It takes time and gets messy sometimes, but it's worth the effort, if it will keep your wheels rolling.

Just my $.02
 

Greenman2ooo

Banned
Location
Illinois
It seems with all of the corrosion from salt, dielectric grease is a necessity. I had a wiring harness replaced this AM that was ONE MONTH OLD. It had dielectric grease on it when purchased. I assumed that was sufficient. Guess not!

Every time out they say to hit 'em with grease. Salt and water corrode those tiny pins and they soon are a corroded mess.

Anyway, it would stand to reason that dielectric grease should be used on ANY connections that are vulnerable. Especially those tiny, thin, cheap connectors used on solenoids. I pictured a corroded connection on the solenoid, since I have seen many connectors in this shape in the past, not necessarily limited to solenoids.

Hope somebody is saved a break down or inconvenience due to this thread.
 

Dusty

LawnSite Member
Location
Southbridge, MA
I learned a trick form a friend that was in the Navy. He showed me to spray the terminals with cosmoline before putting them together and then spray the completed connection afterward. I get it at an industrial supplier in spray cans by Spray-on (a Sherwin-Williams Company) under the product name PDRP. Haven't had problems since I started using it. There are times that dielectric grease is called for but on battery & solenoid terminals, this works great.
 


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