Fungicide

Mitty87

LawnSite Silver Member
I have a couple clients who have some fungus patches on their lawns this year, it has been a very rainy and humid summer compared to the usual dry summers. Is fungicide application something I would need to have a license for? If not I may just recommend a lawn care company. If its something I am ok to do, what is a product I can use and order online, as there are no lawn fungicide products in any store where I am. Thanks
 

kemco

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Memphis TN
I've used a few others but I've had the most success with armada 50 wdg. It's around $140 for a 2# bottle FWIW. Get what you pay for I guess.
 
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Mitty87

LawnSite Silver Member
The only thing is it is on lawns I installed, so I wanted to be able to solve the problem myself and the only lawn companies I am in contact with are organic companies. There is weed man I can use but they have a terrible reputation all over Canada. I'll look into the laws I guess and see if I can do it, if not I'll just pay weedman. thanks
 

Marine03112

LawnSite Silver Member
The only thing is it is on lawns I installed, so I wanted to be able to solve the problem myself and the only lawn companies I am in contact with are organic companies. There is weed man I can use but they have a terrible reputation all over Canada. I'll look into the laws I guess and see if I can do it, if not I'll just pay weedman. thanks
Or you can have the customer order bioadvanced fungus control for lawns attach to hose and spray
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
In some states you are free to use "RTU" products--"Ready-to-use" (squirt bottles). No mixing or calibration required.
Possibly, that would include ready to use dry products. Not sure. Spreaders still have to be calibrated.
For instance, in Michigan: I quote:
For persons as part of their job:

"For example, a person who works at a hospital, school, factory, golf course or an apartment complex that uses only a general use, ready-to-use product for managing a pest is not required to be a certified applicator or a registered technician."

In Canada, be sure to offer overseeding with an advanced disease-resistant seed.
Options for seeding: short-cut and broadcast, aerate first, slit-seed, or seed then topdress.

Also, be sure to advise the customer to never water at night. And to only water twice per week to reduce the overall average humidity. Hot, rainy and humid nights stimulate rapid spread of fungi. When the snow returns to Canada the fungus will die out. Until next year.
 
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MattCurbAppeal

LawnSite Member
Location
Oklahoma
I have a couple clients who have some fungus patches on their lawns this year, it has been a very rainy and humid summer compared to the usual dry summers. Is fungicide application something I would need to have a license for? If not I may just recommend a lawn care company. If its something I am ok to do, what is a product I can use and order online, as there are no lawn fungicide products in any store where I am. Thanks
I don't know about laws in Canada, but if you can't find any kind of simple home use type of fungicide at your local hardware store then I would guess you probably need a license in your area. Check your local laws. If the patches are in full sunlight, you could always try getting a roll of black roofing paper, laying it over the patches, and burning the fungus out. That would only work in mid-summer when the temperatures are highest and it would kill the grass as well. But, no more fungus.
 
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Mitty87

LawnSite Silver Member
Thanks. Its too bad, but it has been an unusual weather summer this year. I think I will fix these 2, don't know if I should be warrantying against this type of thing in the future though. Should fungus be my responsibility on new turf jobs? We don't have any actual warranty on turf, but it's not a huge job to fix and seed a couple square feet worth of patches on 2 lawns.
 

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