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Get my rental IR 185 this weekend!

AceSprinkleRx

LawnSite Member
Location
Wyoming
With a number of accounts already lined up I'm still getting a few calls in the PM from a small newspaper ad.

It's coming with 100' of hose, but has the twist-on connector instead of a quick-coupler. Spoke with the guy today and he says they have an adaptor which allows a bib hookup. So I went and picked up a 3/4" ball valve, a couple of 3/4" pipe nipples, a couple of adaptors going from pipe thread to hose and back again. Also grabbed up 50' of 3/4" hose rated for a 500psi bursting point.

I'm basing the fact most residential systems have 3/4" hookups of one sort or another.

With the rental and additional items I picked up I hope to clear a little bit of profit but am mostly concerned with getting the experience right now.

I might pick up a reducer to 5/8" & 1/2" just to have. And I don't think I'll run into any 1" stuff.

Do you recommend anything else or something I missed?

~
 

Wet_Boots

Banned
Location
metro NYC
If your compresser is set to connect to a standard faucet, you want to be able to adapt from any threaded pipe to garden hose threads. 1/2" 3/4" are most common, and I also carry bushings and couplers for one inch pipe, and even an adapter for 1/4" pipe, in case I need to connect the air at a backflow preventer.

Anyone ever need a 3/8" adapter to winterize?
 

MikeK

LawnSite Member
Location
Twin Cities MN
I know many here will disagree, but I strongly believe in using a pressure regulator when winterizing. No more than 40 PSI should be used to winterize
 

Aran

LawnSite Member
MikeK said:
I know many here will disagree, but I strongly believe in using a pressure regulator when winterizing. No more than 40 PSI should be used to winterize
Totally agree MikeK, high volume low pressure. I run a max. of 50psi, and will increase that a bit only on very large flow commercial zones, but will increase the pressure only while the zone is already on and will reduce pressure before changing to the next zone. Using too high a pressure reduces the life expectancy of the system.
 

Wet_Boots

Banned
Location
metro NYC
Most air compressors are already regulated, and what damage have you ever observed from a blowout pressure of 60 psi? Orbit spray heads don't count.
 

PurpHaze

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Visalia, CA
Wet_Boots said:
Most air compressors are already regulated, and what damage have you ever observed from a blowout pressure of 60 psi? Orbit spray heads don't count.
Rotors are usually where the problem might occur with too high of pressure. The plastic gears are water cooled and the air (too high/too long) can damage the rotors.
 

Wet_Boots

Banned
Location
metro NYC
I'll repeat - "what damage have you ever observed from a blowout pressure of 60 psi?" - Gear drive rotors don't fail at that pressure, not even the old Toro 300's that sometimes speed way up on air. And their life is not shortened. I do believe that the Rainbird imitation of the MP Rotaters may have blowout issues, from what I've read, but I think they're happening even at lower pressures. At higher pressures, the most common head failure in older systems was the Nelson impact head (the old two-piece case design)
 

bicmudpuppy

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
Aztec, NM
Wet_Boots said:
I'll repeat - "what damage have you ever observed from a blowout pressure of 60 psi?" - Gear drive rotors don't fail at that pressure, not even the old Toro 300's that sometimes speed way up on air. And their life is not shortened. I do believe that the Rainbird imitation of the MP Rotaters may have blowout issues, from what I've read, but I think they're happening even at lower pressures. At higher pressures, the most common head failure in older systems was the Nelson impact head (the old two-piece case design)
I will also maintain that 60psi is fine, but if you exceed that, I hope you don't have any Hunter PS04's in the ground. They make great rockets and the closer you get to 80psi+, the more launches you will experience. Nelson.....even sprays, I think you could launch them w/ 30psi, but then I'm a certified Nelson Hater.
 
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AceSprinkleRx

LawnSite Member
Location
Wyoming
MikeK said:
I know many here will disagree, but I strongly believe in using a pressure regulator when winterizing. No more than 40 PSI should be used to winterize
If I need one I'll definitely grab one up. I've never operated a tow-behind and was under the impression you could regulate the pressure there at the source. We've had many compressors in the shops I've worked at, and I've run air tools off of truck compressors.

Even used an old Lincoln (car) AC compressor once and sidemounted it to a 351 windsor I dropped into a '69 Bronco to refill the 33" BFG's once I got off the trail and back onto the highway.

~
 
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