Getting my but kicked

AI Inc

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Southern NH
Older system say 18 yrs old or so. Commercial building.
HUnter ICC clock Hunter pgv valves.
Have voltage at the clock. have voltage at the valve Connect solenoid to fields wires , voltage drops to 0.

ANy clues?
 

1idejim

LawnSite Fanatic
Older system say 18 yrs old or so. Commercial building.
HUnter ICC clock Hunter pgv valves.
Have voltage at the clock. have voltage at the valve Connect solenoid to fields wires , voltage drops to 0.

ANy clues?
The vac measurement at the valve is false, this is proved when you place a load on the circuit.

I’d suspect the common because you’ve said “wires”.

Regardless, the wiring is either open or so degraded the electrons aren’t flowing from clock to solenoid and back. There’s a good chance poor splices are the issue

A few resistance measurements would help to diagnose
 
OP
A

AI Inc

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Southern NH
I tried swapping the common to another spare wire that ohmed fine.
Same result.

This is a weird jobsite and one that Im a little skeptical to spend too much time on.
At my first visit here. Trying to get the rest of the system running I found some sabotage . Im assuming someone did that because they didn't get paid. Nothing destroyed but someone wanted someone wasting time here.
The master valve wire was cut at the master valve and disconnected from MV tap and screwed to unused zone tap.
 

1idejim

LawnSite Fanatic
I tried swapping the common to another spare wire that ohmed fine.
Same result.

This is a weird jobsite and one that Im a little skeptical to spend too much time on.
At my first visit here. Trying to get the rest of the system running I found some sabotage . Im assuming someone did that because they didn't get paid. Nothing destroyed but someone wanted someone wasting time here.
The master valve wire was cut at the master valve and disconnected from MV tap and screwed to unused zone tap.
Anytime you place a load on a circuit and your potential disappears you either have an open or more likely so much resistance on the circuit the electrons can’t do their job.

You know me Steve, I’d begin measuring resistance although there’s one thing you might try. Wire a solenoid directly to the common and a zone terminal and light it up. This could be a hinky transformer.
 
OP
A

AI Inc

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Southern NH
Anytime you place a load on a circuit and your potential disappears you either have an open or more likely so much resistance on the circuit the electrons can’t do their job.

You know me Steve, I’d begin measuring resistance although there’s one thing you might try. Wire a solenoid directly to the common and a zone terminal and light it up. This could be a hinky transformer.
Yes, I was thinking that. I havnt taken the clock out of the equation yet.
 
OP
A

AI Inc

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Southern NH
Had we stayed longer my next step was to bypass the clock and run common and zone right to transformer taps and see what happens.
 

magna111

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
NJ
Electricity is similar to water. Your voltage reading is like psi, you can have 70psi static but if there’s a restriction your psi is going to drop to nothing once you try and use it. Somewhere you’ve got a restriction in the electrical system, start at the clock and work out from there.
 

DitchDiggler

LawnSite Member
Sounds like a short to ground. Use a 24v transformer, remove the common and the station wire from the controller. Connect one output of the transformer to both the common and the station wire. Connect the other output of the transformer to one side of a separate solenoid and the other solenoid wire to an earth ground. If the solenoid clicks or there is current ( amperage) , you have a short to ground.
 

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