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i was just wondering do any of you use hand cutters to trim shrubs, i was driving by a bank and saw another LCO trimming shrubs with hand cutters, not those little ones with the 1/2 in blades but the one with like a foot long balde on them, I couldnt understand why the gas cutters wouldnt be more efficent I know they must do this permanently because I saw them doing it a a resedential afew weeks ago, is there any benefeit to them doing this???
 

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I'm relatively new to the business, but I use hand-shears on a lot of trimming jobs. Once I get an Echo Pole-Trimmer I may change my mind, but I can fly with them and they make it a lot easier to get a precise cut... for me.

I am pretty sure that gas trimmers or not, I will still use the hand shears from time to time.
 

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It always amazes me at how many people in this business think it is ok to use gas powered prunners on ALL shrubs.

This is not directed at anyone who has responded to this or any other post.

Certain shrubs can be power prunned and that is the best way, other shrubs need to be hand prunned. One type of shrub in one setting may get power prunned but the same shrub in another setting may get hand prunned. How do you power cut a deceduious shrub and cut it 1/8 to 1/4 from the new terminal bud without cutting all the leaves in half. can not be done. this is where you need to hand prune. Power prunners can cause a greater disease and insect invasion.

I am not against power prunners as I have multiple sets but also have a bucket full of the felco hand prunners as well.

All I am saying is that in certian situations calls for different prunning skills. We also use the long bladed hand shears as the man from the original post was using. Sometimes these are good to use by windows of office building where the noise needs to be limited.

Good day to all and hope everyone is having a great season.
 

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Kicken

Great response.........


Though, I got to tell ya. We do most all with the power clippers. On occasion the hand clippers. There are circumstances where selective pruning is needed.
 

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I have a set of the longer ones (the two handed 12" blade shears) like those described above that I carry in my trailer (milkcrate full of miscellanious supplies) for such occasions such as "a touch-up" if I ever need them. Problem is, - I never use them. I always just grab a saw if I see something that needs touchup, because I figure that when I get over there, there will probably be more. As far as the other kind of hand pruner for selective pruning, I use Fiskars for both hand AND extended by-pass pruning.;)
 

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I did one next to my driveway by hand sunday. It just didn't make sense to put on all the safety stuff and fuel up the gas trimmer for a little 5 minute maintenence.
 

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Something worth thinking about is what are you actually losing by shearing a Rhododendron, Azalea or Vibirnim? First, it’s still personal preference to “round or square up” one of these shrubs. Also, many times with the rainy conditions of the spring time, you may get less than 2 weeks of flowering on these plants. And, this leaves the other 50 weeks of the year with just a green shrub. With that in mind, shearing off next years’ flowering mechanism on these shrubs, IMO is not a big hardship.
In addition, a sheared Azalea or similar shrub can be as pleasing to the eye as sheared Ilex, with the only real difference being leaf size and color. However, I’m not saying a hand pruned shrub next to sheared shrubs isn’t a nice change to break up the landscape, but, besides the much greater expensive of hand pruning, sometimes there is just not enough in the week to hand prune.
 

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Originally posted by GLAN
Yes Switch, totaly agree
And what about those 30 - 40 year original plantings?
Are you sure you want "agree" with me???:D

As far as 30 year old shrubs, I have taken a chainsaw and cut over 2 feet off the sides to a 30 year old Yew hedge, with excellent results. We cut a 25 year old holly tree to the ground, and in 3 years we now have a beautiful 3 foot high holly bush.
What’s worth thinking contemplating is, in the case of the holly tree, for the cost of just removing the top wood and foliage; we now have a very nice shrub. Otherwise, we would have to pay for stump removal, plus the cost of a new tree/shrub, and its installation.
 

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Originally posted by [email protected]
Are you sure you want "agree" with me???:D

As far as 30 year old shrubs, I have taken a chainsaw and cut over 2 feet off the sides to a 30 year old Yew hedge, with excellent results. We cut a 25 year old holly tree to the ground, and in 3 years we now have a beautiful 3 foot high holly bush.
What’s worth thinking contemplating is, in the case of the holly tree, for the cost of just removing the top wood and foliage; we now have a very nice shrub. Otherwise, we would have to pay for stump removal, plus the cost of a new tree/shrub, and its installation.
Yeah I do :)

Also those 30 year old plantings, ya need to keep them from becoming to large Rhody's, Azaleas and so on............. hand clipping is not going to do that.

Homeowner needs options......................Trim back hard and keep them to a comfortable size (average cost and is maintenance) Rejuvinate, reducing the size and allowing to grow back to a manageable size ( hight cost at first, minimal till the required size is reached) Rip out and replace ( highest cost )
 

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While on the subject of pruning. Is it recommended to prune a weeping snow cherry tree? The branches are beginning to touch the ground in a few places. I would use man shears and trip up from the ground two feet, is this correct and when is the best time of year to do this?
 

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late fall is best for pruning any of the fruit trees ( fruit bearing and none fruit bearing )

However if you're looking to selective cut the elongated branches touching the ground, then do so.

We prune all during our working season as necessary. If we can schedule for a more correct time, we will, if not? Can't worry about it. Our work load also prohibits doing absolutely everything at it's absolute correct time.
 

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We own a 175 tree peach orchard and we always prune late winter to early spring. Most plants can be pruned anytime of the year but the optimal time would be fall into early winter when dormancy takes over. Unless its a flowering shrub that flowers in late spring or during summer, then i would prune them after the flowers die back.
 
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