Have we found a solution to wild violet yet?

HighChiefKC

LawnSite Member
I done a thread search and spent an hour reading old threads with different products experimented. It appears everyone is getting the same results of it browns up the leaves but just comes back. I’ve tried Drive XLR8 mixed with 3 way, and recently Surepower. I was going to throw more money at the problem with Horsepower, but from what I’ve read, it’s the same results.
Anyone came up with a better solution this year?
 

zlandman

LawnSite Bronze Member
Location
Ohio
Multiple applications and stay after it. Progressive improvement is best hope unless gly the whole thing.
 

Digitaria Sanguinalis

LawnSite Senior Member
I done a thread search and spent an hour reading old threads with different products experimented. It appears everyone is getting the same results of it browns up the leaves but just comes back. I’ve tried Drive XLR8 mixed with 3 way, and recently Surepower. I was going to throw more money at the problem with Horsepower, but from what I’ve read, it’s the same results.
Anyone came up with a better solution this year?

Quinclorac = no
2,4-d, Dicamba, MCPP = no

Cool season
Triclopyr = yes
Fluroxypyr = yes

Those are the key ingredients needed to control wild violets. Multiple applications will be needed.
 

Marine03112

LawnSite Silver Member
I use Quinclorac with tenacity. Every five weeks I hit them well. After a season there gone. Persistence is the key. There is no one app treatment for violets. There a pain.
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
Nothing is for sure. In my most recent test, T-Zone (TZ) had a slight lead over 3-way, Surge, Speedzone and quinclorac combined with these same products.

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RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
Keep in mind that wild violets have a strong underground rhizome system. Most of the time the plants are connected together by their roots. They creep outward from the main plant with underground rhizomes.
Keep deep edging between any neighbor's wild violet patch.
Some hand cutting or digging of the oldest and biggest plants helps eliminate the patch. If the soil is wet you may be able to yank out some of the long roots and rhizomes. Try to include some weed products which include dicamba--which is root absorbed.
Otherwise, my only suggestion is persistent effort. Two hand sprayers. Maybe apply 3-way. This then followed by T-Zone. Repeat in about two weeks--or on your next site visit. Include a surfactant--around an ounce per gallon. Addition of Drive might help slightly.
Wild violets tend to resprout from the roots and rhizomes. Knock them out again when they are still small.
Some experts suggest spraying is more effective in the fall. I am not sure I believe this idea. I would like to see a side by side test comparing spring and fall treatments.
Maybe I can try a fall treatment with a three-way, and check the results on individual wild violet clumps in spring.
 

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