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Help IDing Disease

Discussion in 'Fertilizers, Pesticides and Diseases' started by JONATHAN CASEY, Jun 2, 2018.

  1. JONATHAN CASEY

    JONATHAN CASEY LawnSite Member
    Messages: 23

    I am hoping for some help. Ive just realized I have a significant issue with a tree. I’ve attached pictures. The tree bloomed last week but then out of no where all the leaves turned brown this weekend. I’ve attached some pictures, looking closely it appears there’s is some kind of fungus. How would I go about determining an appropriate course or action?

    D1B7792C-4D2A-4B3A-8107-0765A3D3E7F0.jpeg

    1293BB85-F0BC-4E5E-AD62-9B35A2FF03B0.jpeg

    F7703A11-68A6-4810-A866-3C22CFF94622.jpeg

    5D085C3F-6E6E-4B30-A1C1-E0585A8B8614.jpeg
     
  2. Trees Too

    Trees Too LawnSite Platinum Member
    Messages: 4,965

    Hawthorn tree with leaf miner insects. Spray with an insecticide with leaf miners listed on the label for control.
    The 3rd pic is just a type of hard algae/moss called lichen. No worries, it's harmless.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  3. OP
    OP
    JONATHAN CASEY

    JONATHAN CASEY LawnSite Member
    Messages: 23

    Thanks very helpful!!
     
  4. turfmd101

    turfmd101 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,701

    Because the larvae live under the leaf epidermis until they are ready to pupate. You are wasting resources treating the foliage as well as doing more harm to beneficial insects. Waste of time & not good practice.

    When the larvae are ready to pupate, they emerge from the leaf and drop to the soil. Once on the ground they are sitting ducks. They will remain there until they emerge as adults.

    After noticing infestations. Apply a residual granular insecticide labeled, ok to apply under tree and drip line canopies. 2 applications 10 to 14 days apart as needed or when a noticeable decrease in activity is apparent. Bifenthrin should be fine, or possibly a subsurface target zone insecticide, since they will only be on the soil surface as they drop to the soil to dig down a few inches & emerge as adult flys to restart the lifecycle.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2018
    hort101 likes this.
  5. turfmd101

    turfmd101 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,701

    Because the larvae live under the leaf epidermis until they are ready to pupate. You are wasting resources treating the foliage as well as doing more harm to beneficial insects. Waste of time & not good practice.

    When the larvae are ready to pupate, they emerge from the leaf and drop to the soil. Once on the ground they are sitting ducks. They will remain there until they emerge as adults.

    After noticing infestations. Apply a residual granular insecticide labeled, ok to apply under tree and drip line canopies. 2 applications 10 to 14 days apart as needed or when a noticeable decrease in activity is apparent. Bifenthrin should be fine or possibly a subsurface target zone insecticide since they will only be on the soil surface as they drop to the soil to dig down a few inches & emerge as adult flys to restart the lifecycle.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    JONATHAN CASEY

    JONATHAN CASEY LawnSite Member
    Messages: 23

    Thanks! How do I know when it’s time to apply it? Do I do it now or wait for a decrease in activity. What would indicate that it’s time?
     
  7. turfmd101

    turfmd101 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,701

    Just noticing the double post. Sorry.

    You start when you notice activity. You finish when you notice no new activity and the current activity looks dormant. Once you have control, the damage to the foliage will remain until it defoliates that leaf. The adult flys target soft tissue (new growth). If the now foliage remains clean. That would indicate control. Once the soft tissue hardens the tree is less inviting & activity may cease. You should prepair to monitor next spring (prime time for egg laying) when spring growth develops.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  8. OP
    OP
    JONATHAN CASEY

    JONATHAN CASEY LawnSite Member
    Messages: 23

  9. turfmd101

    turfmd101 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Messages: 1,701

    P.s. I not sure you have leaf minor. The damage you have looks like a root issue.
    The damage is not synonyms with leaf miner. Leaf minors leave winding trails like a very winding river. Look it up. You have leaf spots. Leaf minor activity won't cause Browning foliage even with severe activity.

    I wanted to clarify best practices & I'D for leafminor but I think your tree is suffering something else.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  10. hort101

    hort101 LawnSite Fanatic
    Male, from S.E. New England
    Messages: 16,658

    I looked it up it's a sawfly
    It's a slimy grub on the surfaceThumbs Up
    https://bygl.osu.edu/node/758
     
    turfmd101 likes this.

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