Help With This Liquid Stuff

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by Ghopper3345, Feb 14, 2020.

  1. Ghopper3345

    Ghopper3345 LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 225

    So we run a 30-0-0 60% slow at a 1/4 per 1000 and we would melt down a 46-0-0 at a 1/4 per thousand. But getting pretty annoying to keep melting down the urea. Or can I go with a 30-0-0 mixture of Urea of Ammonium Nitrate fast release at like 2 oz per 1000 instead. Or is that too hot for a lawn? We spray at about 2.0 -2.5 gal per 1000 sqft

    Thanks for the inputs!
     
  2. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 16,398

    Hopper, I think the urea is fine. I used it for many years. Quick release-of course.
    You cannot start the jet agitation until it is dissolved, of course.
    So, you have to stir with a canoe paddle, shovel or whatever you have. Squirting it with a hose inside the tank is helpful, too. Maybe attach a 3 foot length of plastic pipe to the hose so you can reach down to the bottom of the tank. Be sure you are legal--needs an anti-siphon valve.
    Myself, I had a plastic screen filter basket over the tank outlet. Attached to inside of tank with silicone sealer. This, so particles could not be sucked into the pump; agitation usually worked fine. I had four agitation nozzles.
    I think the ammonium nitrate is more likely to burn the grass than urea.
    You will have to try it on your own lawn to get an idea of the chance of fertilizer burn in hot weather. Spray a spot double over and triple-over to get the feel for it. I always reduced the nitrogen at temps over 80 degrees.
    Fine fescue is more sensitive to nitrogen burn, especially under hot dry conditions.

    Did you mean to say a quarter pound of the fert you mentioned--or a quarter pound of nitrogen actual per thousand sqft?
    I normally mixed in about a seventh as much potash. However, I omitted the potash in hot weather.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
    hort101 likes this.
  3. OP
    OP
    Ghopper3345

    Ghopper3345 LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 225

    so the issues is getting to the tanks and working the urea in to them trucks are tight in some, I would be going at 1/4 per 1000 on both so 1/2 total.. I thought I heard guys running 30-0-0 Urea of Ammonium Nitrate fast release and not having issues? Thanks so much for getting back to me
     
  4. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 16,398

    "Urea of ammonium nitrate" ? Not familiar with that.
    Compared to urea, ammonium nitrate has a higher burn potential--there is a chart somewhere.
    Urea at a bag per 100 gallons will usually work. A lot depends on your temperature, gallons per thousand, grass type, nozzle, pressure and skill of the operator.
    Chemlawn spray gun with the green nozzle would probably work. If you use half inch hose and 100 pounds pressure.
    Do not forget to: "Disperse the burst!"
    That means if you have not sprayed for 15 seconds--the pressure builds up high at the gun. The first three seconds puts out about double the usual amount. After that, the friction in the hose slows the flow, to a more normal level.
    Calibrate carefully. Walking at 2 mph and spraying a swath of 7 feet gives you around 1200 sqft per minute.
    Reduce to 6 feet 8 inches to get 1000 sqft per min at 2 mph. 2 mph is 176 feet per minute.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
  5. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 16,398

  6. OP
    OP
    Ghopper3345

    Ghopper3345 LawnSite Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 225

    Great chart! Thanks for the info! So basically just use less it’s that powerful and make sure enough water is getting put down?
     
  7. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 5,989

    Sorry, I have to ask if you have a NJ Fertilizer License.
     
    JLSLLC likes this.
  8. The Green One

    The Green One LawnSite Member
    Messages: 15

    In the Fall with cooler temps, sure add the UAN.

    Use a storage tank the night before for melting down the urea and add a N stabilizer. Then pump in the finished liquid into tanks the morning of your workday.
     

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