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We really have been shocked that this high of a pressure was even a possibility given the street location etc. How common is 155psi at the meter?
Depends on elevation change between the water source and the house location... I believe the formula is every 10 ft rise is about 2.1 PSI. So assuming a base pressure of 50 PSI at the water pumps, its seems to be a drop of elevation of about 100 ft.

On the flip side, the pumps might be at your same elevation and they have the pressure kicked up to 155 PSI to have it reach houses with 100 ft elevation change above the pumps... lol

In most locations (the flatness of Florida and most of the south excluded) a PRV seems to be a standard need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Alrighty - so, new request by client I wanted to bounce off of all of you.

They are asking if we could install the regulator right after the anti-siphon as we have suggested to them, but if we could put a bypass on it. Essentially, add a side loop with a ball valve that they can open up if they want more pressure in those lines on occasion for refilling their pool, spraying down patios etc.

What say ye? And if this isn't a terrible idea, would just adding a bypass with a single ball valve in parallel with with the PRV be sufficient, or should we also add a ball valve before and after the PRV to take it out of the loop completely when they open the bypass?
 

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Tell them no. Screw the gimmicks, and do it right. Install a regular PRV, but offer to make it one of the much more expensive models that has a top pressure setting of 150 psi. More realistically, make it a standard model with the capability to upgrade to a higher adjustment range. While you're at it, you remove the existing hose bibs and replace them with high-flow-capacity garden valves. Garden valves have female thread connections, because they were meant to connect to galvanized steel pipe. They get to buy a roll or two of serious high grade garden hose, with a 3/4-inch inside diameter, and a high pressure rating. That will be evidence that they aren't just talking. Talk is cheap, but a 200-psi-rated rubber garden hose is not. (figure $2 per foot)



In any event, you probably don't want a PEX-inlet PRV, since a threaded or soldered inlet connection will be stronger. Note that you would never set a high-range PRV at 150 psi in this scenario. You really want to drop the pressure by at least 50 psi, which is what the manufacturer expects from you, because the PRV needs that much drop to open up fully, and give you maximum flow. (and 100 psi is more than enough hose pressure)

Another idea, if absolute maximum pressure is desired, is to separate the sprinkler system from the hose bib line, even if it means more digging and pipe.
 

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By the way, how big is this property? If it were small enough, a single unregulated hose bib near the house could feed however many feet of high-grade garden hose they need. Another thought is what size(s) are the pipes in the supply chain? All one inch? Bigger? Smaller? If it's all one inch, and the homeowners are obsessed with More Water from hose bibs, then the 5/8 water meter might be upgraded (many 5/8 meters have already been redesigned to handle flows to 25 gpm and beyond - a 1 inch meter will have a 50 gpm rating)

A place to get the high-grade hose and high-capacity hose nozzles - Underhill
 

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Essentially, add a side loop with a ball valve that they can open up if they want more pressure in those lines on occasion for refilling their pool, spraying down patios etc.
The PRV will not affect the length of time it will take to fill the pool by anything noticeable. With the hose bib full bore open, the PRV will basically be fully open only causing a very minimal bit of friction loss.
And 75 psi is more than enough to wash off a patio.
But hey, if you want to please them, go for it...
 
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