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How a landscaper is keeping America great.

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by phasthound, Oct 11, 2017.

  1. oqueoque

    oqueoque LawnSite Gold Member
    Male, from Jersey
    Messages: 3,380

    He did hire illegals as it states in the article in the early years & quoted below..


    '"In CoCal’s early years, Medrano said, he gave work to undocumented immigrants, just as work had once been offered to him. But he later decided that it was not worth risking his business by breaking the law. That’s when he turned to the H-2B visa program, initially recruiting family and friends in Mexico."
     
    hort101 likes this.
  2. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 5,150

    You're right, I missed that part. Many companies did but that's not a valid excuse. I'm not defending this practice. He has since corrected this and is obeying the law.
     
    hort101 likes this.
  3. oqueoque

    oqueoque LawnSite Gold Member
    Male, from Jersey
    Messages: 3,380

    A lot of companies did it. Your old neighbor Lipinski grew big and used illegals until they got raided in the 90's. They then sold off the residential properties, kept the commercial and really grew with snow. Then sold out to a private equity firm, and are now called Merit Service Solutions.
     
  4. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 5,150

    You got that right!
     
  5. TPendagast

    TPendagast LawnSite Fanatic
    Male
    Messages: 10,763

    Let me chime in on the “woes” of Mexico for a moment.

    1)Mexico was once a better more developed country than the u.s.
    Then bigger faster meaner white guys took their stuff.
    Oil, gold, cattle grazing
    Most of the choice land Mexico owned the us took by force.

    2)everything is cheaper in Mexico
    Oh they only make $10 a day?
    Well the pay approx 100th the price for food that we do,
    Land for a Mexican citizen is practically free (similar laws to Alaskan home stedder act)
    And they pay next to nothing for building materials or utilities.
    Interesting for a country with no lumber industry?

    Mexicans don’t want to live here
    There’s nothing wrong with life in Mexico
    They want to come here temporarily to work to abuse and take advantage of the currency exchange rate, which is currently similar to winning the lottery.
    The peso is 1/19th of a dollar.
    So a $10 and hour job is 190 pesos
    Times 8 hours is 1520 pesos
    Which is half a years pay, in a single day.
    Comparatively
     
  6. Mow-Daddy.com

    Mow-Daddy.com LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,727



    Here are 2017 equivalent prices, for Mexican Peso and US Dollar in parentheses. Prices are from Mexico city.

    Also here is average household income for Mexico. 1 days work is nowhere near 1/2 a year income for a Mexican worker.

    In Mexico, the average household net-adjusted disposable income per capita is USD $12,806 a year,
    Food
    MXN (USD)
    Basic lunchtime menu (including a drink) in the business district Mex$ 136 ($7)
    Combo meal in fast food restaurant (Big Mac Meal or similar) Mex$ 90 ($4.79)
    500 gr (1 lb.) of boneless chicken breast Mex$ 67 ($3.56)
    1 liter (1 qt.) of whole fat milk Mex$ 17 ($0.93)
    12 eggs, large Mex$ 31 ($1.65)
    1 kg (2 lb.) of tomatoes Mex$ 20 ($1.04)
    500 gr (16 oz.) of local cheese Mex$ 74 ($3.94)
    1 kg (2 lb.) of apples Mex$ 37 ($1.97)
    1 kg (2 lb.) of potatoes Mex$ 19 ($1.03)
    0.5 l (16 oz) domestic beer in the supermarket Mex$ 20 ($1.09)
    1 bottle of red table wine, good quality Mex$ 212 ($11)
    2 liters of Coca-Cola Mex$ 24 ($1.30)
    Bread for 2 people for 1 day Mex$ 15 ($0.83)
    Housing [Edit]
    MXN USD
    Monthly rent for 85 m2 (900 Sqft) furnished accommodation in EXPENSIVE area Mex$ 20,759 ($1,108)
    Monthly rent for 85 m2 (900 Sqft) furnished accommodation in NORMAL area Mex$ 12,812 ($684)
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2017
  7. TPendagast

    TPendagast LawnSite Fanatic
    Male
    Messages: 10,763

    MEXICO CITY is a very small swath of Mexico.
    The exchange rate varies HEAVILY around the country
    The immigrant workers coming here to the US are not coming from good jobs in Mexico City.
    Sure a few chilangos come here, but they hardly represent the standard Mexican immigrant worker.

    Please stop trying to use google to figure out something you don’t know.
    I employ Mexicans
    I speak Spanish
    I know what their income there is
    I know what they get paid here
    I talk to them in their language about it and their motivations and intentions.

    $10 a day in rural Mexico (most of the country ) is the household income not the individual income.

    $3,650.00 is the standard income

    An h2b worker averages $15 An hour for 6 months
    Almost $16,000.00

    Many of my guys will Work state projects getting paid $54.00 an hour

    So yea keep reading google
    It’s like looking at the world through key hole.
     
    Reliable 1 likes this.
  8. TPendagast

    TPendagast LawnSite Fanatic
    Male
    Messages: 10,763

    In parts of the country where pay is better (i.e. urban zones), the minimum salary for Mexicans is 70.1 pesos ($4.35) per day, according to El Daily.

    Most of the country 10 PESOS a day (not dollars) is average.
    That’s .62 cents in USD
    Or $115 for half a year.

    Mexicans are accustomed to working 10-14 hour days

    Last time I checked
    $10 an hour gives them half a years salary in one day.

    Try actually visting Mexico
    Not TJ
    not Mexico City or Puerto viarta
    But the villages where these people are coming from.
     
  9. Mow-Daddy.com

    Mow-Daddy.com LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,727

    Ok which is it?
     
  10. Mow-Daddy.com

    Mow-Daddy.com LawnSite Gold Member
    Messages: 3,727

    The exchange rate does not vary around the country. A peso is a peso.
    Cost of living may vary, wages may vary, but exchange rate doesn't.
     

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