Lawn Care Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Does that have something to do with the microbes that decompose the stump and roots using Nitrogen as a food source hence making it unavailable to the plants above (though I usually notice this more in lawns).

I remember seeing something about that on HGTV a couple of weeks ago.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,622 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ding ding ding ding......we have a winner....:D :D Although I was really looking foward to bobbygedds answer...:p

John----You wtch way too much TV...you should be out working...:)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,647 Posts
Ummm..................

If you mulch planting beds with any "organic" hardwood mulch or any wood product. The soil will be depleated of NITROGEN.


NITROGEN is the FUEL source for decomposition


So why would would you think the stump is any different?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,622 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Originally posted by GLAN


So why would would you think the stump is any different?
Im not sure what you mean by this......I do believe a rotting stump removes precious N from the soil. (See my other threads about planting on top of tree stumps.)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,143 Posts
Hmmm.

So you mulch leaves in the fall, are you actually removing Nitro. from the soil as well? Or is it just the massive decomp. of a stump that is noticable, and the leaves break down differently.

Should I varnish the wood mulch before installing?:D
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
776 Posts
There is a thing called C:N ratio. That is Carbon to Nitrogen. The microbes in the soil prefer I believe about 20 or 30 to 1. Things like grass have lower C:N ratios than things like wood chips. When the microbes come to things like grass clippings, they are happy because they don't have to work very hard to get the N that they want out of it. However when they come to things like wood chips, they still want that N, but have to go through the C to get it. It takes a bit longer for them to get the N out of the wood chips, so while they are doing that, they aren't processing N from more viable sources.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
988 Posts
fblandscape's answer is closest to being accurate.
Microbes do not utilize N as a fuel source.
All living organisims, from simple cell to complex have to have Carbon.
The organic chemical reaction that occurs does not deplete the nitrogen, it ties it to exchange sites making it unavailable to turf. This reaction also has an effect upon pH, soil structure, microbial populations, etc.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
787 Posts
hey, should I be writing this down?

psst-Bobby, can I borrow a pencil?
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top