how many seasons until kentucky blue requires core aeration, excess thatch?

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by roody2333, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. roody2333

    roody2333 LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 851

    I can check for excessive thatch to know if it really needs coring to control thatch, and some thatch is beneficial, but just asking on average suppose you seed or sod KBG, how many years before the rhizomes have no where to go and thus die and become excessive thatch?

    Or if it's only a few seasons old and doesn't have excess thatch, will coring for the sake of compaction reduction harm the rhizomes and thus better toletting it mature more until the first core aeration?
     
  2. BigJlittleC

    BigJlittleC LawnSite Silver Member
    from Chicago
    Messages: 2,876

    Don't over fert with heavy n and don't over water and thach should not be a big issue in kbg.

    As far as coreing. I give new lawns at least a year. After that it's as needed based on site conditions.
     
    Delmarva Keith likes this.
  3. Hineline

    Hineline LawnSite Senior Member
    Messages: 704

    Sodded KBG should be cored the following year after installation. As BiglittleC stated, following good agronomic practices will reduce the need for coring. Coring however, is a good practice in the fall for vitality and plant health in the dead of summer the following year.
     
    Delmarva Keith likes this.
  4. Delmarva Keith

    Delmarva Keith LawnSite Member
    Messages: 227

    Here, we pretty much core aerate and overseed every Fall for “high maintenance” lawns. It definitely won’t hurt it to core it by a year old.

    Keep up with Fall ferilization so it goes into winter strong.
     
  5. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 5,366

    Increasing microbial activity will reduce thatch build up.
     
    KerbDMK likes this.
  6. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Messages: 14,432

    Certain of the aggressive Kentucky bluegrass cultivars have more rhizomes. They cover the ground tightly. Ideal for football fields. Bluenote, Limousine and the compact America types, for instance. Still, they look fine even without aeration.
     
  7. lawn king

    lawn king LawnSite Silver Member
    Messages: 2,488

    I try to get my clients to aerate every other year, it really makes a difference in turf quality here in the northeast. Some clients do it on a regular basis, others don't want to hear it!
     

Share This Page