How to convert line voltage fixture into low voltage

rrseth

LawnSite Member
Location
Colleyville, TX
First up, I am an advanced DIYer, so if I offend anyone with my questions, I apologize in advance. We are in the process of building a pool and my 7 year old would like to have the following led tree ( https://www.brightbaum.com/collections/ginkgo-tree/products/taylor-58-ginkgo-warm-white ) on a spot near the pool, and I am very supportive of the idea. Per the NEC 2017, this would not be compliant as it is less than 5 feet from the water line. It is a line voltage fixture, and I can't find any manuals on it. I know from their marketing literature "the tree runs at only a mere 22W of electricity!". Any help on how to go about converting this from line voltage to low voltage would be appreciated.
 

JoeRagMan

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Near TMI
If the LED’s are line voltage, the only way to make it low voltage would be replace all of the LED’s in the tree. Maybe email or call the manufacturer and ask. I would not want that near a pool, maybe outside of the pool deck somewhere safe. JMO, good luck.
 

Mumblingboutmowers

LawnSite Senior Member
First up, I am an advanced DIYer, so if I offend anyone with my questions, I apologize in advance. We are in the process of building a pool and my 7 year old would like to have the following led tree ( https://www.brightbaum.com/collections/ginkgo-tree/products/taylor-58-ginkgo-warm-white ) on a spot near the pool, and I am very supportive of the idea. Per the NEC 2017, this would not be compliant as it is less than 5 feet from the water line. It is a line voltage fixture, and I can't find any manuals on it. I know from their marketing literature "the tree runs at only a mere 22W of electricity!". Any help on how to go about converting this from line voltage to low voltage would be appreciated.
You are reading this wrong. It means 22 watts is what it uses, not 22 volts. I would say that it is almost certainly 120v.
 

Mumblingboutmowers

LawnSite Senior Member
After posting I realize that I read your post incorrectly and you were reading correctly. I guess just do as joeragman said and change out the wiring and lights in the tree if necessary. May not be though if they are already 24 volt. What you could do is Move the transformer to the house and then you would only have 24v wiring heading out to the pool (if that's what you need to get around code). Here is one website I found that sells 24v Christmas lights, (which your tree may have, along with a transformer). https://www.christmascentral.com/christmas-lights/24-volt-connect-lights/starter-sets/#
 

rlitman

LawnSite Silver Member
Location
Long Island
I'd start by calling the manufacturer and asking. LED elements do not run on line voltage. Period. They all need a power supply. Of course, some of them have internalized power supplies that cannot be separated (such as LED light bulbs that screw into edison sockets), but though I cannot find details on this tree, I suspect that a central power supply in the trunk of this tree feeds power to the branch lights. If that's the case, it should be possible to relocate the power to a safe distance.
 
OP
R

rrseth

LawnSite Member
Location
Colleyville, TX
Thank you all for your responses. The leds are soldered in, and there are a couple hundred of them, not possible to replace with a low voltage rated light. Attached is a picture of the adapter at the bottom of the fixture. Dumb question, is there a device that can replace this to make it compatible with a low voltage set up?
IMG_0647.jpg
 

JoeRagMan

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Near TMI
I think about the only thing you can do is make sure the 110 VAC circuit that is powering the transformer is up to code, ie, GFCI circuit , etc. When in doubt, call in a professional! Electrical problems around water is no joke! Good luck.
 
OP
R

rrseth

LawnSite Member
Location
Colleyville, TX
Understood and agree, the fixture itself is outdoor rated, so no worries there. What would be a safe distance for this to be from the pool, assuming it won't work on low voltage?
 

JoeRagMan

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
Near TMI
Does the manafacturer give any recommendations? Might be a good idea to check their webpage or call them. Will this be anchored in case of a wind storm? Just some things to think about...
 

Mumblingboutmowers

LawnSite Senior Member
Thank you all for your responses. The leds are soldered in, and there are a couple hundred of them, not possible to replace with a low voltage rated light. Attached is a picture of the adapter at the bottom of the fixture. Dumb question, is there a device that can replace this to make it compatible with a low voltage set up?View attachment 387805
I am still a little unsure of what the end goal is here, but if it is to not have 120v running alongside the pool and only low voltage instead, there is a solution. (I still think that code is in effect even if it is low voltage). Just cut the transformer out and move the transformer inside the home and use small wire (18 gauge) to run outside the home and hardwire it to the 24 volt wires heading into the tree.

24 volts is still dangerous especially near water. Maybe run a regular 120v wire outside of the home (underground in conduit) from a different direction than what you are working with and route it 5 ft from the pool and connect your tree there. Then that way you are 5 ft away. And anchor the tree down somehow or have a short cord that it would not be possible for the tree to fall into the pool when still plugged in.

Or better yet, try to find some type of solar powered décor and go that route.
 

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