I want to start a tree business

Discussion in 'Tree Climbing, Pruning, Felling' started by Guest, Oct 13, 2008.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    YES, welcome to the site air :waving:

    these guys have offered some GREAT tips and I agree with some of what was already said... try to keep your debt down, bid accordingly so you are making what you need for each job individually and be true to yourself when it comes to your business...you seem to have your things together and shoudl do well for yourself

    make sure you look around and search the site some as well...these members know what they're talking about and have offered some great information already :clapping:
     
  2. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    welcome to the site...glad to have you join us :)
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    Welcome to the forum Air:waving:

    Maybe you can apply for a government backed small business loan. Although credit is tight right now.
    I would work for a tree company until I saved enough for 6 months living expenses and enough money to at least have a good down payment for equipment. You don't want to load yourself down with too much debt
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    Doing jobs on the weekends in high residential areas is a great way to get more work. Hit up all the local lawn guys and tell them youl cut them in if they pass work on to you. I have found both these very very good ways to drum up work in the easiest way. Have you insurance and papers in order. Customers love it when there are no hassles. A great clean up will sell a bad job.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    Air, like Charles says, welcome. It sounds like you are a realist. So here goes, be honest to yourself about what you are qualified to do. BY this I mean, what are you going to do for your propective clients. This could be anything from only doing removals to consulting for the development of a NEW yard or green space. Maybe you are good at all the aspects of the tree care game!!!!

    The next thing is, what is the NEED in the area that you intend to work. For example, there would make little sense in buying a stump grinder IF no one will hire you. There are odd things that happen in the tree game, it is very common to have a feast or famine of arborists in an area. Under each range there are quirks that happen, if there is lots of competition for the work, there is always some bozo who will work for less than the cost of the fuel to do the work (work for next to nothing). If there isn't an arborist in the area, you will be explaining (everytime) what an arborist is and what they can do.

    As far as purchasing equipment, identify what you will be doing, locate the equipment (new or used) you will need, and, like your plan suggests, save up for the purchase.

    I believe you have your s__t together, be honest with yourself, and be realistic about your market,and you will do great. The other option is to buy a lawn mower and do tree work as an add-on! :nono: Just kidding!!!!
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    Sorry for the double post, maybe you should just buy out one of the existing companies. A lot of them are for sale, or at least the equipment is. In todays economic times, IF you can use someone else's money, do it.

    I had another thought about your seemingly simple question. There are hundreds of things to consider when starting a NEW operation. Labour and employee laws ....... client relations, to actually doing tree work. One thing you may want to consider is talking to the busiest companies, and work out a deal to perform some of their extra work on a contract basis. With the limited labour pool in Canada, anything is possible. The Federal election is on Tuesday, I would bet that on Wednesday there will be at least 3 candidates looking for work. :laugh: OH, who would want to hire a politician, they MAY not be useful for anything other than doing an "internal inspection" on the chipper.:clapping:
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    Air, I must apologies, your question was a fair one, however, the answer is longer than I could type. Like I said before, find out what the market is, know who the competition is, work at a price YOU can live with (include a profit margin over and above your finance and maintenance cost). Then be ethical, conscientious, and reliable, and you too will be overbooked.

    Knowledge is becoming part of the total plan also. Be aware of local, and provincial regulations. There are some certifications that will separate you from the normal tree trimmers.

    Good luck, and if you would like to discuss this a little more privately, feel free to PM me.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    LOL Andy, I have been there done that. The VERY FIRST rulle of arboriculture is "If you do something RIGHT, your client will tell a friend, IF you do something WRONG, they will tell anyone who will listen"!
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    Hey hows it going? The disposal of material CAN be a major PITA. I am lucky, I started out hauling the debris to the landfill in a 1/2 ton hooked up to a trailer I built out of an old 1/2 ton. There was NO tip fees, BUT the issue was being able to show up when the dump was open.

    After a year, I was able to buy a used 250 Bandit chipper. It was a bargin, but thats another story. The moral is that now I offer the chips to the client first, IF they don't want them, I usually have other people who will take them. If we have to we haul them home and we have a client base that will pay to come and get them.

    We are restricted with what we can do with Elm chips (they MUST go to an approved landfill site {DED}). This of course is JUST a case of logistics, and we have been able to secure keys to the landfills so we can dump after hours. Mind you I am in rural Saskatchewan, where EVERYONE is friendly!!!!LOL
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    I started my own thing last year. I know what worked for me was start slow. Get the feel for the market. You dont want to go buy tons of equipment with out having the work to pay for it. Next, be smart about your purchases. Work with what you have for as long as you can, (i.e pick up for brush instead of chipper). When it really starts to be a pain then upgrade. Finally when you do upgrade try to purchase equipment that multi task.
    Example:
    When I started I threw brush in the truck. Then learned a rope in bottom helped to unload the truck if you tied it off to something. Then I bought a EZ Dumper. WOW big saver in time. When work was flowing in faster than I could do it I bought the chipper. Was going to go with a new 6'' but found a REALLLLY good used 10'' twice the hp and diesel for the 3k less (More bang for my buck). Ive had a tractor for years and am now looking to upgrade with a grapple rake.
    These guys have great advise; DONT BURRY YOURSELF IN DEBT right off the bat. Thats how new companies fail sooooo fast. You gotta know where the money is going to come from that is paying the bills before those bills get there. Good luck, happy trails and keep us in the loop
     

Share This Page