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I want to start a tree business

Discussion in 'Tree Climbing, Pruning, Felling' started by Guest, Oct 13, 2008.

  1. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    Oh I forgot one other thing; bid work for what you can do the job for. Dont fall into the negotiations with the customer. Remember that this is your lifestyle, what you make is what you need to survive on. Dont bid yourself out of a life.
     
  2. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    Only thing to be careful with is rental equipment is not always in the best of shape. I rented a chipper once and a builder had rented it before me. He dulled the knives and tried to sharpen them himself :nono:. Not knowing how a chipper works he sharpened the flat side of the blade creating an axe like blade :confused:. It didnt chip. I had to return the machine, they put new knives into it, and didnt give me a discount :cry:. 2.5 hours down the tube. Never rented from them again. Advice: Check the machine completely, knives, chains, saftey features, and operation before accepting it.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    Having read everyone elses posts i firstly can only agree with what has been said and i just thought i would add to it! The only way you will be successful in your business no matter how much kit and certifications you have (although it all helps!!!) is the ability to sell your 'product' to the client. You guys have it half beat in the US because most people now what an arborist is - here in the UK they refer to tree guys as 'tree surgeons' and i really hate that term - i mean come on we dont wear white coats:laugh: i make great efforts to 'educate' the client on what is right for the tree not them! The trick is to spending time to explain in detail what you propose to do and why, so the client can see the service that you provide is 'value for money' if they do then it doesnt really matter what you charge for a job.
    When you are starting up you will mess up on what time you have allowed yourself to do a job - i think we have all done that somewhere along the way:cry: remember though see it through and do the best you can all of the time as a bad job will travel around your clients and potential clients far quicker than a good job.
    Lastly it dont matter how small you start off get a clear goal in your mind of what you want to acheive in five years time, ten years time and go for it at a speed that suits you, just keep focused and stay on track.
    It is hard and i am sure everyone on here will agree there is times when you do think why am i doing this but if it is in your blood you will stick with it and like us all you will love it:D I wish you all the best from 'accross the pond'!!
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    i think this has to be number one rule in what ever you do!!!!!!:laugh: UK saying "badun travels faster than a goodun":waving:
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    First i would like to second what everyone has already said.

    However i might even change one thing...

    A lot of people have suggested keeping little debt, i try to buy everything in cash...obviously that is hard to due with nothing.

    Clean up, being straight with people, honest and build a business ground up.

    Do you have a truck right now, I dont mean a nice F 450 with a arbortech on the back but any pick up.??

    You use to climb any gear you still own and saws?

    Craigslist can be a way to "free" advertise
    Being Members of ISA and TCIA and even C.A. can set you apart from other companies and give you the edge.

    I think starting slow is key, with some honesty straight foward bid industry level and you will grow fast.

    Best of Luck.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    + 1...

    Something else that I would personally recommend and always buy extra is the insurance. I am not sure if I would get it for a chain saw but chippers, grinders, lifts. DEFinetly.

    It can be a great way to get stgarted and use tools that you dont useenough to own or dont have the cash or credit to buy at that time
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    That is an awful story.

    I always ask them to start the equipment and when I have rented chippers i have brought some brush and small logs and sent them through. When i sure to rent alot I bought my own knives from Bandit and had them install them and take them off each time for free. I would give the yard guy a nice bottle of wine when is annivesary of him and his wife, birthday and holidays as a thank you.

    I rent a lot through them they have treated me very well and I only use them.

    Sorry to here about your experience an important thing to bring up though.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    That is awesome.

    How ancient is ancient?
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    I am a Forestry Technician; graduated 10 years ago. I've got 2 years experience working as a climber and ground crew boss. For the city and for a local tree company; 8 years ago. I had to go to where the money was, and left the tree business to work for the federal government. I'm feeling called to get back to trees, and follow my heart. I want to start my own company. I've been in touch with the city and the federal government in regards to running my own business. I've done some research and found that there are about 30 listed companies in Ottawa and surrounding areas. All of them are overbooked with work.

    Any advice?

    I have no money to invest. I have no equipment. I have no property (that I can use for a tree service business). I have some education, experience, knowledge, and tons of desire and drive.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Guest

    Guest Guest
    Messages: 0

    To all of you who have provided me with advice here... wow. Thank you.

    There are some gems of wisdom here. I need to mull over what you all wrote. I like the idea of taking things slow, being honest, paying for things with cash, bidding fairly and sticking to the services I am capable of doing.

    My plan (I think) is going to be to start doing jobs on the weekends and in the evenings. When I start making more money than my 9-5 job, I'll reassess and go full time.

    I don't have a truck yet, but when there is a will there is always a way.

    I have another question... I don't have a place to dump brush. Is it reasonable to call another company to chip debris? How much does that usually cost? Or if anyone has any other suggestions about places to get rid of debris? I'm interested to know.

    Thanks again for all the advice. I'm going to spend more time here and read up on all the knowledge that's available here. Its invaluable...:clapping:
     

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