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Interesting link about CGM

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by CT John, May 25, 2004.

  1. CT John

    CT John LawnSite Member
    Messages: 90

    I was hoping some of the brain-trust here can shed some light on this research from ISU. Basically, this link about CGM shows that unless you apply it at 40#/1000 sq ft you will not see any improvement in terms of the CGM's ability to control weed seed germination. It also states that CGM is 10% N and it breaks it down that at 40#/1000 this is equivalent to 4#/1000 of N. Now, what confuses me is that this flies in the face of conventional wisdom that tells us that most turfgrass species only require about 2-4# of N per 1000 annually. It also shows that on some test plots they applied it at an equivalent of 12# of N annually. :eek: Do nitrogen requirements just not apply to organics? Your thoughts?

    http://turfgrass.hort.iastate.edu/pubs/turfrpt/2000/cgmongoing.html
     
  2. Tim G

    Tim G LawnSite Member
    Messages: 14

    The first time I applied cgm I did it at a rate of 20#lbs per k. It stunk up the yards I did for about a week. I looked for a dead animal in mine. At that rate the soil couldnt breath is what I believe. You need a good microbe population for it to work best. I use it more as a fertilizer that a germination supressant, if weeds dont grow its just a bonus.
     
  3. Garden Panzer

    Garden Panzer Banned
    from Seattle
    Messages: 313

    I've used corn gluten for years and my understanding is that fungi that break down the CGM are responseable for the "pre-m" "effect". I don't think too highly of it- I would love to say it works so good it's off the hook!
     

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