• Thankful For Your Family…. Business?
    Landscaping businesses are often family endeavors. While this can combine the best of both worlds (personal and professional), it isn’t always smooth sailing. Click here to read more.

Ipm

phasthound

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Mt. Laurel, NJ
I thought I'd start a new thread based on Integrated Pest management.
Many have heard of it, but many have a misunderstanding of it's principles and and business advantages. I believe it is important for LCO's to better understand these principles in order to provide great results with less dependence on pesticides. Regulations are only getting tougher.

To start with here are a couple of definitions.

From Rutgers Turf Grass Integrated Pest Management:
IPM programs for turfgrass begin with adherence to sound cultural practices. Turfgrass maintained in a healthy, vigorous condition is less susceptible to damage and recovers faster than stressed turf. Simple changes in cultural practices can have a profound effect on turf vigor and, subsequently, on specific problems in the turf stand.

A good IPM definition comes from Dr. Vic Gibeault and others from the University of California, Riverside. They defined IPM as "multiple tactics used in a compatible manner in order to maintain pest populations below levels that cause economic or unacceptable aesthetic injury without posing a hazard to humans, domestic animals, or other non-target life forms."
IPM combines all available pest management methods to produce the healthiest lawn possible. It does not aim to totally eliminate pests, but to maintain pest populations at tolerable levels. Pesticides are often part of an IPM program, but are selected and applied responsibly to avoid health risks to other living organisms than those targeted.
Pest management control practices in an Integrated Pest Management program include:

soil management
turfgrass selection
appropriate cultural practices
biological and genetic controls
physical or mechanical removal
exclusion through prevention and sanitation
pesticides.
 

grassman177

LawnSite Fanatic
that is how i do things, and in the end,i lastly have to use pesticides in some cases. i rarely just spray a fungicide for example without evidence that it wont go away any other way. there are many times i have suggested to customers to change watering habits(like quitting for a period of time) and wait it out as favorable conditions are in the forecast for the problem to no longer be an issue. none have ever thanked me directly , but they certainly trust me and i have been right most of the time, if conditions continue and disease does get worse(i keep tabs aver day or so) then i recommend treatment. this is just an example though. i never ever just spray without reason
 

CHARLES CUE

LawnSite Gold Member
Location
BURTON WV
Thats want i like about definitions they don't make any scents. I know what IPM is but after reading your definition iam not sure if you would use some thing more down to earth you might get more response. Just had to respond
Charles Cue
 
OP
phasthound

phasthound

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Mt. Laurel, NJ
Thats want i like about definitions they don't make any scents. I know what IPM is but after reading your definition iam not sure if you would use some thing more down to earth you might get more response. Just had to respond
Charles Cue
Those definitions were from Rutgers and U of California. The aim of IPM is to reduce the amount of pesticides used when controlling pests. When most people say they are using IPM, in reality they are spot spraying rather than calendar based broadcast treatments. That is certainly a step in the right direction.

I prefer to use the term Plant Health Care as it focuses more on growing healthy plants rather than just treating pests. Both IPM & PHC allow for the use of pesticides.
Some principles of PHC for turf include:
  • site suitability
  • soil preparation
  • seed selection
  • cultural management
    • mowing
    • irrigation
    • nutrient management
  • monitoring
  • biorational controls
  • chemical controls

These are all subjects that we have talked about. I'd say that if we all focused on the steps in the above order in our businesses, we would be providing our customers with nice lawns and greatly reduce the amount of pesticides used.
 

CHARLES CUE

LawnSite Gold Member
Location
BURTON WV
Those definitions were from Rutgers and U of California. The aim of IPM is to reduce the amount of pesticides used when controlling pests. When most people say they are using IPM, in reality they are spot spraying rather than calendar based broadcast treatments. That is certainly a step in the right direction.

I prefer to use the term Plant Health Care as it focuses more on growing healthy plants rather than just treating pests. Both IPM & PHC allow for the use of pesticides.
Some principles of PHC for turf include:
  • site suitability
  • soil preparation
  • seed selection
  • cultural management
    • mowing
    • irrigation
    • nutrient management
  • monitoring
  • biorational controls
  • chemical controls

These are all subjects that we have talked about. I'd say that if we all focused on the steps in the above order in our businesses, we would be providing our customers with nice lawns and greatly reduce the amount of pesticides used.
I know what your saying But it's easyer said than done at least for me it's hard enough to get the mowing part and that don't cost them any thing.Most think 2inchs is high. Talk to them about top dressing and seeding [that cost money] and than spend money on water i dont think so. Just keep the weeds from growing and make it green. I am all for IPM but the home owner has to do there part i can change but they wont
Charles Cue
 

phillie

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
indianapolis, in
Its funny you say that..I have a customer that has planted a few plugs of zoysia every year. I live in Indiana it doesnt look good at all, kinda like cheetah print. Its only green for 3 months out of the year. Im sure to go see more brown spots this year. :dizzy: Most of my customers appreciate that I only put the products down the lawn needs and using the right seed in the right locations. You just have to educate your customers and they'll come around.
 
OP
phasthound

phasthound

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Mt. Laurel, NJ
I know what your saying But it's easyer said than done at least for me it's hard enough to get the mowing part and that don't cost them any thing.Most think 2inchs is high. Talk to them about top dressing and seeding [that cost money] and than spend money on water i dont think so. Just keep the weeds from growing and make it green. I am all for IPM but the home owner has to do there part i can change but they wont
Charles Cue
Yeah, I know. But our job is to provide them with a healthy lawn that looks great, By continuing to explain the benefits of proper mowing and irrigation the average person will begin to better understand it will cost them less. The benefit to us is that it will be easier and less costly to succeed in providing great results. Telling them once is not enough. When you leave the invoice, insert an informational piece, show the photos of great lawns that use less water & pesticides. Never underestimate the ablity of people to change, we do it all the time.

The lawn care business is changing due to scientific data, up coming regulations and public perceptions. Stay ahead of your competitor and start implementing other methods.

In the news the last couple of days:

Atrazine, a weed killer widely used in the Midwestern United States and other agricultural areas of the world, can chemically "castrate" male frogs and turn some into females, according to a new study.http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/science/03/01/pesticide.study.frogs/index.html?hpt=Sbin


France's highest court has ruled that US agrochemical giant Monsanto had not told the truth about the safety of its best-selling weed-killer, Roundup.

The court confirmed an earlier judgment that Monsanto had falsely advertised its herbicide as "biodegradable" and claimed it "left the soil clean".

The company was fined 15,000 euros (£13,800; $22,400). It has yet to comment on the judgment.

Roundup is the world's best-selling herbicide.

Monsanto also sells crops genetically-engineered to be tolerant to Roundup.

French environmental groups had brought the case in 2001 on the basis that glyphosate, Roundup's main ingredient, is classed as "dangerous for the environment" by the European Union.

In the latest ruling, France's Supreme Court upheld two earlier convictions against Monsanto by the Lyon criminal court in 2007, and the Lyon court of appeal in 2008, the AFP news agency reports.

Earlier this month, Monsanto reported a fourth quarter loss of $233m (£147m), driven mostly by a drop in sales of its Roundup brand.
 
Top