Is this builder doing sod wrong?

Trisao

LawnSite Member
Location
Iowa
Same issue around here. They really only care if the sod survives long enough to sell the house. Under one of my yards it’s all clay and rock
 

Crazy 4 grass

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Minnesota
Sod might survive better if it is not laid directly over the old brick tree ring o_O
20210913_150428.jpg
 
OP
J

JawT

LawnSite Member
Meh

I just did 4 acres of sod for a cemetery
The spec from the US GOVERNMENT was to install the sod over a 70/30 gravel soil mix and the soil they wanted was only 7-12% organic matter.
Sounds strange
But the sod is doing fine
The nice thing about the way they had it put in is you can drive right over it with no muddy gushy
The installed it in 50 foot rolls with a skidsteer
Only really bad rain affected us

interesting spec but it seems to work

wait n see what happens
Most developers just need the grass long enough to sell the house
Wow that would be interesting to see. That's a lot of grass
 
OP
J

JawT

LawnSite Member
Most sod in Michigan is Kentucky bluegrass. Try to find out the exact varieties and mixture. Because then you can look up the disease resistance and quality ratings of the exact cultivars that were used. Modern varieties or old fashioned cheap seed--generic quality?
Here is an example of a premium mix of bluegrass and the varieties included. Seed is in short supply--prices are up in a major way. Hopefully your sod contains these or similar varieties.


If it is browning or peeling up at the edges--that is a sign that the watering was missing the edges or corners. Talk to a couple owners of small lawn care companies--let them look at it and suggest the best plan of action. Their experience and education will be helpful.
That looks like great stuff but that seed is 3x more expensive than Barenbrug and way more than my local feed store generic mix. I don't think I could get clients to pay for that especially after markup. Can you overseed at 2.5 lbs/1000sqft with that stuff?
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
Yes 2.5 pounds per thousand sqft is excellent.
Some companies recommend even less--but more seed is better in case not all of it germinates. Not all will take hold in an overseed situation.
Try to seed 8 weeks before frost.
Outsidepride.com Tells us:

Seeding Rate & Planting Time​

  • New turf: Sow 2 - 3 pounds Kentucky Blue grass seed per 1,000 square feet or 80 -120 lbs per acre
  • Over-seeding: Sow 1 - 1 1/2 pounds Kentucky Bluegrass seed per 1,000 square feet or 40 - 60 lbs per acre for broadcast over-seeding
  • Planting: Plant Kentucky Bluegrass Supreme seed when soil temperature reaches 55 degrees in spring up until a minimum of 8 weeks before frost in fall
 
OP
J

JawT

LawnSite Member
Yes 2.5 pounds per thousand sqft is excellent.
Some companies recommend even less--but more seed is better in case not all of it germinates. Not all will take hold in an overseed situation.
Try to seed 8 weeks before frost.
Outsidepride.com Tells us:

Seeding Rate & Planting Time​

  • New turf: Sow 2 - 3 pounds Kentucky Blue grass seed per 1,000 square feet or 80 -120 lbs per acre
  • Over-seeding: Sow 1 - 1 1/2 pounds Kentucky Bluegrass seed per 1,000 square feet or 40 - 60 lbs per acre for broadcast over-seeding
  • Planting: Plant Kentucky Bluegrass Supreme seed when soil temperature reaches 55 degrees in spring up until a minimum of 8 weeks before frost in fall
That’s great. A 25lb bag could go a long way.
Do you feel Kentucky Bluegrass is the best for overseeding in cool humid area where we are here in MI?
I see people talk about using Bar Fescue, and a general “tall fescue mix,” and RTF fescue, and Bluegrass.
Any preference on what seems to take better in southern Michigan?
 

RigglePLC

LawnSite Fanatic
Location
Grand Rapids MI
I am not sure bluegrass is the best. This is because with the seed being so small and so slow to start, only part of the seed takes hold. This before the old grass grows and competes with the tiny new seedlings. I have no proof of this. Short mowing is recommended by some experts until the bluegrass is established and attained about 2 inches tall.
My opinion (no proof), is that perennial rye takes hold better in an overseed situation.
There is lots of rye used for overseeding Bermuda grass in Arizona. Naturally you want to use a top quality perennial rye. A cultivar that is red thread and gray leaf spot resistant.
"Homerun" or "Big League" for instance.
Better still is "Zoom"
 

TPendagast

LawnSite Fanatic
Wow that would be interesting to see. That's a lot of grass
Yea
There’s a hydraulic sod roller bobcat makes
We put it in with 700 pound 50 foot long 2 foot wide rolls.
The supplier didn’t cut it in 4’ rolls, cuz they don’t have that kind of cutter , but the roller and the machine will do 4’ wide , 50 foot long rolls.
Pretty cool
Pretty fast
 
OP
J

JawT

LawnSite Member
I am not sure bluegrass is the best. This is because with the seed being so small and so slow to start, only part of the seed takes hold. This before the old grass grows and competes with the tiny new seedlings. I have no proof of this. Short mowing is recommended by some experts until the bluegrass is established and attained about 2 inches tall.
My opinion (no proof), is that perennial rye takes hold better in an overseed situation.
There is lots of rye used for overseeding Bermuda grass in Arizona. Naturally you want to use a top quality perennial rye. A cultivar that is red thread and gray leaf spot resistant.
"Homerun" or "Big League" for instance.
Better still is "Zoom"
Thank you for the info! I imagine pretty much any seed from a major manufacturer right now is as disease resistant as possible. I tried searching online for homerun and big league, and I couldn’t quickly find how to order them. I think we will order a variety seed types from Barenbrug which we can get within 2-3 days. They have an RPR that sounds like it will work.
 

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